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1 - 10 of 17 results for: GSBGEN

GSBGEN 299: The Core Curriculum in the Workplace

GSB students are eligible to report on work experience that is relevant to their core studies under the direction of the Senior Associate Dean responsible for the MBA Program. Registration for this work must be approved by the Assistant Dean of the MBA Program and is limited to students who present a project which, in judgment of the Advisor, may be undertaken to enhance the material learned in the first year core required courses. It is expected that this research be carried on by the student with a large degree of independence and the expected result is a written report, typically due at the end of the quarter in which the course is taken. Specific assignment details and deadline information will be communicated to enrolled students. Units earned for this course do not meet the requirements needed for graduation.
Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Feinberg, Y. (PI)

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings.nnThis course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. In the final team presentation, your challenge is to craft an oral presentation that will persuade your audience to accept your strategic recommendations. By doing this, you will see why ideas, data and advocacy are combined for a professional, persuasive presentation. nnThis practical course helps students develop con more »
Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings.nnThis course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. In the final team presentation, your challenge is to craft an oral presentation that will persuade your audience to accept your strategic recommendations. By doing this, you will see why ideas, data and advocacy are combined for a professional, persuasive presentation. nnThis practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important new feature of this course is that a team of external communications coaches work in concert with the professor to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback.nnIn this course you will learn to:nn- Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational leveln- Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documentsn- Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style n- Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences n- Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aidsnnStudents at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course. Waitlists have been long for this course, and you're encouraged to keep that in mind as you make your course selections. Waitlisted students are encouraged to attend the first two classes.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 317: Reputation Management: Strategies for Successful Communicators

Successful leaders have to conceive, author, rebuild, pivot, differentiate, and finally maintain a personal reputation to make a lasting, recognizable and powerful identity. Reputation Management will explore how you can effectively communicate to create, adapt and maintain your personal reputation. Your reputation remains fluid as you navigate your career decisions and interact with different professionals along your journey. nnThe course is designed along three interlocking elements: reputation management literature, relevant case studies, and curated guest speakers. Students will learn the fundamentals of strategic corporate communication and the risk of not managing reputation effectively. These frameworks will be extended with specific case studies to illustrate where individuals, groups, and firms have faced the challenge of managing reputation effectively. We will focus on both traditional and virtual components of communication including the relevancy of online reputation manag more »
Successful leaders have to conceive, author, rebuild, pivot, differentiate, and finally maintain a personal reputation to make a lasting, recognizable and powerful identity. Reputation Management will explore how you can effectively communicate to create, adapt and maintain your personal reputation. Your reputation remains fluid as you navigate your career decisions and interact with different professionals along your journey. nnThe course is designed along three interlocking elements: reputation management literature, relevant case studies, and curated guest speakers. Students will learn the fundamentals of strategic corporate communication and the risk of not managing reputation effectively. These frameworks will be extended with specific case studies to illustrate where individuals, groups, and firms have faced the challenge of managing reputation effectively. We will focus on both traditional and virtual components of communication including the relevancy of online reputation management. Finally we will invite well-known leaders from a range of industries who have built and sustained their reputations, through effective communication. Each leader has had to manage their reputations in the public eye, and alongside their peers, supervisors, and employees. Guests will be invited to discuss their conscious and unplanned strategies of how to successfully communicate the kind of person, leader, innovator, or public figure they strive to be. nnStudents will benefit from a rich blend of frameworks, cases, and speakers enabling them to successfully enter the work force and create their own, personal reputations. Students will create a case study drawn from their own experience (or personal network), of a reputation dilemma. A final assignment requires students to research their own reputation history by projecting what they think their reputation is, creating their own survey for friends, colleagues and employers to take, conduct three interviews about their personal reputation with three individuals who have worked closely with them, and then synthesize all this feedback into a cohesive paper and short video that reflects their authentic work and personal reputation. Throughout the course students will post at least one blog drawn from class concepts and respond to posts by peers in the class.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 319: Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing

The course will be structured around the perspective of a foundation or a high net worth individual who has decided to devote substantial resources to philanthropy and wishes to decide which philanthropic goals to pursue and how best to achieve them. Although there are no formal prerequisites for the course, we will assume that students have experience working at a foundation, nonprofit organization, impact investing fund, or similar organization, or have taken an introductory course in strategic philanthropy such as GSBGEN 381. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's course, Problem Solving for Social Change ( GSBGEN 367) , which has a different focus from this one.)
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 352: Winning Writing

This twice-a-week full-quarter workshop will offer techniques and practical in-class exercises for writing better -- better memos, emails, feedback for colleagues, news releases, responses to questions from the media and from interviewers, and opinion pieces. Glenn Kramon, an editor who has helped New York Times reporters win 10 Pulitzer Prizes, will teach the course along with accomplished journalists with expertise in powerful, persuasive writing for business. They will provide not only helpful tips but constructive feedback on students' work. They will also share thoughts on how best to work with the news media.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Kramon, G. (PI)

GSBGEN 367: Problem Solving for Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's and Mark Wolfson' course, Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing ( GSBGEN 319), which has a different focus from this one.)
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

GSBGEN 370: Social Innovation Project

Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

GSBGEN 390: Individual Research

Need approval from sponsoring faculty member and GSB Registrar.
Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Akbarpour, M. (PI) ; Anderson-Macdonald, S. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Begenau, J. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berg, J. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Broockman, D. (PI) ; Bryzgalova, S. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; Choi, J. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Gipper, B. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Hebert, B. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Kosinski, M. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Lester, R. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Lustig, H. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Ranganathan, A. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Saban, D. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Saloner, G. (PI) ; Sannikov, Y. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Seru, A. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Somaini, P. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Sterling, A. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Vanasco, V. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Weintraub, G. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Xu, K. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI)

GSBGEN 515: Essentials of Strategic Communication

Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.nnThis course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work.nnFocusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery.nnDeliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice.n nThis highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback.n nIn this course you will learn to:n-Recognize strategically effective communicationn-Implement the principles of strategic communication across different platformsn-Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documentsn-Diagnose and expand, your personal authentic communication stylennAs you make your super round selection, keep in mind that wait lists have been long for this course.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 541: Innovation and Problem Solving

This is a project-based course on problem solving and creativity. It is expected that everyone who takes the class will work on some significant problem that's currently ongoing (e.g., the design of part of a complex project, a difficult negotiation over a new venture). The course is designed to achieve two goals. First, it will give you tools that should increase the probability that you'll make (hopefully substantial) progress on your problem. Second, it will introduce you to research that explains why it's sensible to try those tools on hard problems---i.e., the point of those tools.nnPlease note that the first goal is stated rather cautiously. There are good reasons for this. I expect that most students will be working on hard problems. (Everyone in the class will be getting help from classmates on their particular problem; why bother your peers with an easy problem that you could solve yourself?) An important idea in cognitive science, Newell's Law, says that magic doesn't exist: more »
This is a project-based course on problem solving and creativity. It is expected that everyone who takes the class will work on some significant problem that's currently ongoing (e.g., the design of part of a complex project, a difficult negotiation over a new venture). The course is designed to achieve two goals. First, it will give you tools that should increase the probability that you'll make (hopefully substantial) progress on your problem. Second, it will introduce you to research that explains why it's sensible to try those tools on hard problems---i.e., the point of those tools.nnPlease note that the first goal is stated rather cautiously. There are good reasons for this. I expect that most students will be working on hard problems. (Everyone in the class will be getting help from classmates on their particular problem; why bother your peers with an easy problem that you could solve yourself?) An important idea in cognitive science, Newell's Law, says that magic doesn't exist: if a problem-solving method is powerful (very likely to solve a certain type of problem), then it only works on a narrow class of problems. So... this course will not give you tools that are both powerful and general. It can't: such tools don't exist. Happily, improving your problem-solving skills, at least in certain domains, is possible, and that's what the course aims to do.nnProgress on hard problems usually requires help from friends and colleagues. Virtually all researchers of creativity agree that most innovations that are both bold and useful involve multiple problem solvers. This course will implement this important pattern by requiring every student to help some classmate with their problem. Carrying out this help will be an important part of your grade.nnAnother important empirical regularity in the field of innovation is that when problems are hard many (perhaps most) candidate-solutions don’t work out. It’s easy to accept that about other people’s ideas; about my own, not so much. So a vital component of effective problem-solving is tough-minded evaluation. This implies rejecting bad ideas or bad parts of a would-be solution. Hence, at the end of the course you will be required to evaluate the progress that a classmate has made on his/her problem and to explain your assessment. (For obvious reasons you will not evaluate the same person you’re helping.)nnIn sum, every student will do three things in this course: generate new ways to make some progress on a problem of their own choosing; help somebody else work on their project; evaluate somebody’s progress.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
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