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1 - 10 of 19 results for: FILMSTUD ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FILMSTUD 100C: History of World Cinema III, 1960-Present (FILMSTUD 300C)

This course will provide an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. We will study some key film movements and national cinemas towards developing a historical appreciation of a variety of commercial and art film traditions. Through an exploration of films from Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America, we shall examine the industrial histories of non-Hollywood film production and exhibition practices that produce the particular cinematic cultures of each region.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Iyer, U. (PI)

FILMSTUD 102: Theories of the Moving Image (FILMSTUD 302)

Major theoretical arguments and debates about cinema: realism,formalism, poststructuralism, feminism, postmodernism, and phenomenology. Prerequisites: FILMSTUD 4.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Oeler, K. (PI)

FILMSTUD 119: Science Fiction

The course will focus on science fiction films that take as a central theme human and nonhuman intelligence and its mediation. Possible films include Solaris, 2001: A Space Odyssey, THX 1138, Tron, Videodrome, Invasion of the Body Snatchers (multiple versions), and Wall-E. How does cinema, through sound and set design, mise-en-scène, cinematography, and animation, engage science fiction¿s exploration of technological and social change, the boundaries of human and non-human, and the nature of cognition, imagination and identity? Are these concerns at the heart of filmmaking or is science fiction a genre at odds with cinema, the most technological of the arts?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Oeler, K. (PI)

FILMSTUD 127: Frankenstein and Film

When Mary Shelley bid [her] hideous progeny go forth and prosper in the 1831 introduction to the revised edition of her novel, she could scarcely have imagined how successful her tale would be in reproducing itself. It is estimated that over 200 film adaptations of Frankenstein have been produced, spanning from Thomas Edison's 1910 single-reel silent film to digitally-enhanced CGI spectacles like Van Helsing (2004) and I, Frankenstein (2014). The films seldom fail to say something about the social settings in which they were produced, and quite often they comment reflexively on the medium of film itself. The monsters depicted can thus be interrogated in terms of the social-semiotic processes by which certain subjectivities and bodies are constituted as the normative ideals of humanity while others are excluded as aberrations. On the other hand, the films offer a register of the historically contingent relations between humans and their technologies not least among them, the relation of the spectator to the cinematic medium and apparatus. nIn this lecture-based course, we shall therefore investigate monstrosity on a number of levels: from the social level at which people are defined on the basis of gender, race, class, or disability in relation to privileged forms of embodiment and subjectivity, all the way up to the technological level at which human beings are arguably being reconfigured at present into cyborgs or human-technological hybrids. We will approach these and other more »
When Mary Shelley bid [her] hideous progeny go forth and prosper in the 1831 introduction to the revised edition of her novel, she could scarcely have imagined how successful her tale would be in reproducing itself. It is estimated that over 200 film adaptations of Frankenstein have been produced, spanning from Thomas Edison's 1910 single-reel silent film to digitally-enhanced CGI spectacles like Van Helsing (2004) and I, Frankenstein (2014). The films seldom fail to say something about the social settings in which they were produced, and quite often they comment reflexively on the medium of film itself. The monsters depicted can thus be interrogated in terms of the social-semiotic processes by which certain subjectivities and bodies are constituted as the normative ideals of humanity while others are excluded as aberrations. On the other hand, the films offer a register of the historically contingent relations between humans and their technologies not least among them, the relation of the spectator to the cinematic medium and apparatus. nIn this lecture-based course, we shall therefore investigate monstrosity on a number of levels: from the social level at which people are defined on the basis of gender, race, class, or disability in relation to privileged forms of embodiment and subjectivity, all the way up to the technological level at which human beings are arguably being reconfigured at present into cyborgs or human-technological hybrids. We will approach these and other questions by way of a selection of Frankenstein films, which we will view, read about, and discuss in detail. It will be important, though, that we not lose sight of the filmic nature of our texts; one objective of the course should therefore be a better understanding of the formal properties of the medium of film how things are depicted, not just what is thematized.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Denson, S. (PI)

FILMSTUD 129: Animation and the Animated Film (AMSTUD 129, FILMSTUD 329)

The fantasy of an image coming to life is ancient, but not until the cinema was this fantasy actualized. The history of the movies begins with optical toys, and contemporary cinema is dominated by films that rely on computer animation. This course considers the underlying fantasies of animation in art and lit, its phenomenologies, its relation to the uncanny, its status as a pure cinema, and its place in film theory. Different modes of production and style to be explored include realist animation, abstract animation; animistic animation; animated drawings, objects, and puppets; CGI, motion capture, and live/animation hybrids.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FILMSTUD 147: Iberian and Latin American Experimental Cinemas, 1960s to the Present (FILMSTUD 347)

This class will offer a panorama of Iberian and Latin American experimental film cultures from the 1960 to the present. We will focus on developments and formations mainly in Mexico, Brasil, Argentina, and Spain, but will cast side glances at Bolivia, Peru, Cuba, Paraguay and Uruguay. Among our main thematic interests will be the representation of the body and sexuality; abstraction; politics; the reading of history; personal subgenres (the essay and the diary film); and collage and appropriation. Readings will range from general theoretical statements on experimental film aesthetics to specific historical and critical excavations of experimental film by contemporary critics and historians.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FILMSTUD 213: Global Melodrama (FILMSTUD 413)

Commonly derided for being over the top, with films in this mode put down as weepies, tear-jerkers, and women's films, melodrama as a genre and a cinematic mode has been reclaimed by feminist and film scholars as providing a powerful site of ideological struggle. In this course, we will develop a historical and theoretical framework to examine how this popular dramatic mode, centered around the family, the home, and personal relationships affords radical critiques of and insights into discourses of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation.n nWe will consider melodrama's careful calibration of sensation and affect through its employment of emotions, pathos, and sweeping performative gestures that afford a sustained engagement with individual and social subjection and suffering. Through an analysis of films from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and by auteurs such as Sirk, Ghatak, Fassbinder, and Almodovar, among others, the course encourages an exploration of global and transnational flows in the adoption of the politics and aesthetics of the melodramatic mode.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Iyer, U. (PI)

FILMSTUD 250B: Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film (COMPLIT 247, GLOBAL 250)

A broad engagement with Indian cinema: its relationship with Indian politics, history, and economics; its key thematic concerns and forms; and its adaptation of and response to global cinematic themes, genres, and audiences. Locating the films within key critical and theoretical debates and scholarship on Indian and world cinemas. Goal is to open up what is often seen as a dauntingly complex region, especially for those who are interested in but unfamiliar with its histories and cultural forms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FILMSTUD 297: Honors Thesis Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FILMSTUD 299: Independent Study: Film and Media Studies

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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