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1 - 10 of 22 results for: DLCL ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

DLCL 1: CSN Undergraduate Colloquium (ENGLISH 1)

This colloquium is intended for undergraduates who are interested in the history and theory of the novel, and who would like to attend the Center for the Study of the Novel's (CSN) annual conference. Before the conference, students will meet with CSN's graduate student staff, to read and discuss a small number of key texts by participating scholars, whose presentations students will then attend. After the conference, the colloquium will meet again, to discuss both the readings and conference papers, and explore their broader implications for the study of the novel. Attendance at both meetings of the colloquium, and at least one panel at the conference, is required for course credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: McGurl, M. (PI)

DLCL 13: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (FRENCH 13, PHIL 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 50: Humanities House student research workshop

For Humanities House student research workshops.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hicks, L. (PI)

DLCL 53: Designing a Life in the Humanities: History, Literature, Print, Art, Film, Community, and Service

This short intensive seminar features Humanities Scholar & Artist in Residence, Clare Whistler, (visiting from England, April 13-27,) will meet for dialogue, workshop, and, for those interested, performance. In order to design a life that integrates meaning and purpose through the Humanities, it is helpful to think in terms of projects, research, collaborations, explorations, locations, and relationships. In five residence based sessions, students will discover personal and professional practices to design and support a life in the humanities, including practical matters: grant proposal writing, gaining non-profit status, creating a Humanities "start up," as well as partnering with investors, foundations, fundraisers, patrons, and community. . This course will be of interest to students who would like to maintain the values of the humanities, make a decent living, find good mentors and collaborators, and give back to the community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Mesa, C. (PI)

DLCL 98: Independent Study for Modern Languages Minor

Independent study for language students pursuing a Modern Languages minor. Instructor consent required before enrolling in this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DLCL 123: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 105B, ARTHIST 305B)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1. Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 143: The Novel, the Global South (COMPLIT 123, ENGLISH 184)

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Great Depression to the present. The seminar will focus on texts by William Faulkner, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Toni Morrison, and Junot Diaz.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

DLCL 152A: DLCL Film Series: Migration (DLCL 354A)

Join us this quarter for our exploration of the theme "Migration," which will look at the representation of displaced and nomadic bodies in international film. Please be aware that some films may include graphic or disturbing content. Viewers are advised to familiarize themselves with the films' content before viewing. Descriptions of the films can be found at https://dlcl.stanford.edu/content/dlcl-film-series-spring-2017-migration. All screenings are free and open to the public and audience members are encouraged to participate in the discussions following the films. Please also note that grades for this course are entirely dependent on attendance, which is taken at the end of each screening. Enrolled students MUST attend AT LEAST SEVEN screenings in order to obtain credit. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Starkey, K. (PI)

DLCL 189C: Honors Thesis Seminar

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 199: Honors Thesis Oral Presentation

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Regular advisory meetings required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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