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1 - 10 of 83 results for: CS

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. The time listed on AXESS is for the first week's logistical meeting only. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 45N: Computers and Photography: From Capture to Sharing

Preference to freshmen with experience in photography and use of computers. Elements of photography, such as lighting, focus, depth of field, aperture, and composition. How a photographer makes photos available for computer viewing, reliably stores them, organizes them, tags them, searches them, and distributes them online. No programming experience required. Digital SLRs and editing software will be provided to those students who do not wish to use their own.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 49N: Using Bits to Control Atoms

This is a crash course in how to use a stripped-down computer system aboutnthe size of a credit card (the rasberry pi computer) to control as manyndifferent sensors as we can implement in ten weeks, including LEDs, motionnsensors, light controllers, and accelerometers. The ability to fearlesslyngrab a set of hardware devices, examine the data sheet to see how to usenit, and stitch them together using simple code is a secret weapon thatnsoftware-only people lack, and allows you to build many interestingngadgets. We will start with a ``bare metal'' system --- no operatingnsystem, no support --- and teach you how to read device data sheetsndescribing sensors and write the minimal code needed to control themn(including how to debug when things go wrong, as they always do). Thisncourse differs from most in that it is deliberately mostly about what andnwhy rather than how --- our hope is that the things you are able at the endnwill inspire you to follow the rest of the CS curriculum to understandnbetter how things you've used work. Prerequisites: knowledge of the Cnprogramming language. A Linux or Mac laptop that you are comfortablencoding on.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Engler, D. (PI)

CS 50: Using Tech for Good

Students in the class will work in small teams to implement high-impact projects for partner organizations. Taught by the CS+Social Good team, the aim of the class is to empower you to leverage technology for social good by inspiring action, facilitating collaboration, and forging pathways towards global change. Recommended: CS 106B, CS 42 or 142. Class is open to students of all years. May be repeated for credit. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 52: CS + Social Good: Implementing Social Impact Projects

Continuation of CS51 (CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects)nnTeams enter the quarter having completed and tested a minimal viable product (MVP) with a well-defined target user, and a community partner. Students will learn to apply scalable technical frameworks, methods to measure social impact, tools for deployment, user acquisition techniques and growth/exit strategies. The purpose of the class is to facilitate students to build a sustainable infrastructure around their product idea. CS52 will host mentors, guest speakers and industry experts for various workshops and coaching-sessions. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their projects with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 51, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 62N: Let There Be Computations

The class will discuss the Theory of Computing as an ambitious intellectual endeavor with impact beyond Computer Science. What are computations? How can their study capture important aspects of the evolution of species, the structure of social networks, and the working of your smart phone? What are the laws of efficiency and complexity that govern computations? We will see surprising algorithms for very familiar problems as well as simple problems no one knows how to solve efficiently. We will encounter logic paradoxes that expose the limitations of computations and explore the different worlds we may be living in, depending on the answers to some of the central problems on computations.n nThe class is intended for students with a wide range of interests. The course will not involve programming. While our class will not rely on any deep mathematics (beyond basic high-school math) we will deal with mathematical formalization of concepts and with mathematical problem-solving. Therefore, some mathematical maturity and interest would be useful.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Reingold, O. (PI)

CS 101: Introduction to Computing Principles

Introduces the essential ideas of computing: data representation, algorithms, programming "code", computer hardware, networking, security, and social issues. Students learn how computers work and what they can do through hands-on exercises. In particular, students will see the capabilities and weaknesses of computer systems so they are not mysterious or intimidating. Course features many small programming exercises, although no prior programming experience is assumed or required. CS101 is not a complete programming course such as CS106A. CS101 is effectively an alternative to CS105. A laptop computer is recommended for the in-class exercises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Taylor, A. (PI)

CS 102: Big Data: Tools and Techniques, Discoveries and Pitfalls

Aimed at non-CS undergraduate and graduate students who want to learn the basics of big data tools and techniques and apply that knowledge in their areas of study. Many of the world's biggest discoveries and decisions in science, technology, business, medicine, politics, and society as a whole, are now being made on the basis of analyzing massive data sets. At the same time, it is surprisingly easy to make errors or come to false conclusions from data analysis alone. This course provides a broad and practical introduction to big data: data analysis techniques including databases, data mining, and machine learning; data analysis tools including spreadsheets, relational databases and SQL, Python, and R; data visualization techniques and tools; pitfalls in data collection and analysis; historical context, privacy, and other ethical issues. Tools and techniques are hands-on but at a cursory level, providing a basis for future exploration and application. Prerequisites: comfort with basic logic and mathematical concepts, along with high school AP computer science, CS106A, or other equivalent programming experience.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 103: Mathematical Foundations of Computing

Mathematical foundations required for computer science, including propositional predicate logic, induction, sets, functions, and relations. Formal language theory, including regular expressions, grammars, finite automata, Turing machines, and NP-completeness. Mathematical rigor, proof techniques, and applications. Prerequisite: CS106B or equivalent. CS106B may be taken concurrently with CS103.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 103A: Mathematical Problem-solving Strategies

Problem solving strategies and techniques in discrete mathematics and computer science. Additional problem solving practice for CS103. In-class participation required. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Co-requisite: CS103.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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