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1 - 10 of 114 results for: CEE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major. Contact hildemann@stanford.edu to request enrollment/permission code.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 6: Physics of Cities

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32D: Construction: The Writing of Architecture

This seminar focuses on the construction of architectural writing. The class will analyze this idea through four topics: formal analysis, manifesto, translation, and preservation. The seminar is divided into two-week modules with each of these four concepts functioning as organizing principles. nnThe first week of each module will involve familiarizing the seminar with both the terms and rhetorical tactics of the given theme by reading and analyzing specific texts and completing a short written analysis (1-2 pages). The second week will expand upon this foundation and involve further analysis in addition to each student writing a short paper (3-4 pages) drawing on the examples discussed and their own experiences in the discipline. The goal of the seminar is for each student to be able to analyze how an architectural writing is constructed and to develop his/her skills in the construction of his/her own writing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32U: California Modernism: The Web of Apprenticeship

This course will study at the development of Modernism in pre and post WWII California. The class will investigate responses to climatic, technological, and cultural changes that were specific to the state but have now become an idealized tread. We will look at architects and landscape architects who apprenticed with significant design leaders and track how their involvement and explore resulted in changes in building technologies, and influenced the next generation of design thinking and experimentation. The investigations will occur through research, drawings and models, as well as site visits.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 32V: Architectural Design Lecture Series Course

Seminar will be a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend the lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates listed below.nApril 12: Kai-Uwe Bergmann of BIG; April 26: Olle Lundberg of Lundberg Design; May 10: Ma Yansong of MAD Architects; May 24: Thomas Woltz of Nelson Byrd Woltz; June 8: Gregg Pasquarelli of SHoP Architects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 107F: Understanding Energy -- Field Trips (CEE 207F, EARTHSYS 103F)

This course is only for students who have already taken CEE 107A/207A/ Earthsys 103 -- Understanding Energy. Please contact Kirsten Stasio (kstasio@stanford.edu) for instructor consent code.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 112B: Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction (CEE 212B)

CEE 112B/212B is a practicum on the Industry Applications on Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). Students will gain insights and develop skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice in VDC and Building Information Modeling (BIM). Students can choose between one of the two project topics: [1] Industrialized Construction with Virtual Parts (No Prerequisite) or [2] Industry Benchmarking & Applications of the VDC Management Scorecard (Suggested Prerequisite: CEE 112A/212A).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kam, C. (PI)

CEE 120A: Building Information Modeling Workshop (CEE 220A)

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)
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