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1 - 10 of 43 results for: BIO

BIO 8N: Human Origins

A survey of the anatomical and behavioral evidence for human evolution and of the increasingly important information from molecular genetics. Emphasis on the split between the human and chimpanzee lines 6-7 million years ago, the appearance of the australopiths by 4.1 million years ago, the emergence of the genus Homo about 2.5 million years ago, the spread of Homo from Africa 1.7-1.6 million years ago, the subsequent divergence of Homo into different species on different continents, and the expansion of fully modern humans (Homo sapiens) from Africa about 50,000 years ago to replace the Neanderthals and other non-modern Eurasians.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 25Q: Cystic fibrosis: from medical conundrum to precision medicine success story

Preference to sophomores. The class will explore cystic fibrosis (CF), the most prevalent fatal genetic disease in the US, as a scientific and medical whodunit. Through reading and discussion of medical and scientific literature, we will tackle questions that include: how was life expectancy with CF increased from weeks to decades without understanding the disease mechanism? Why is the disease so prevalent? Is there an advantage to being a carrier? Is CF a single disease or a continuum of physiological variation ¿or- what is a disease? How did research into CF lead to discovery of the underlying cause of most other genetic diseases as well?nnThrough critical reading of the scientific and medical literature, class discussion, field trips and meetings with genetic counselors, caregivers, patients, physicians and researchers, we will work to build a deep understanding of this disease, from the biochemical basis to the current controversies over pathogenic mechanisms, treatment strategies and the ethics and economics of genetic testing and astronomical drug costs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 35N: Climate change ecology: Is it too late?

This Introductory Seminar will explore the consequences of climate change on ecological communities, focusing on two emerging concepts: "disequilibrium," which emphasizes that it can take long time for communities to respond to climate change because of species interactions, and "historical contingency," which proposes that the order in which species invade and disappear as communities re-assemble in response to climate change will determine which species will persist. The seminar will involve lecture, discussion, writing, and visit to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fukami, T. (PI)

BIO 47: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using a topic in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Plant Biology as a practical example. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for field- and lab-based data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and finally writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course will focus on nectar microbes at Stanford's nearby Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. Students, working in teams, will develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. The capstone of the course will be an oral defense of students' findings, as well as a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Labs will be completed both on campus and at Jasper Ridge. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 52: I, Biologist: Diversity Improves the Science of Biology (CSRE 52H)

Disciplinary priorities, research agendas, and innovations are determined by the diversity of participants and problem-solving is more successful with a broad range of approaches. Using case studies in biological research, we propose to use these insights to help our students learn why a diverse scientific community leads to better discovery and improves the relevance of science to society. Our premise is that a diverse set of perspectives will impact not only how we learn science, but how we do science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 53: Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects. This course is identical to Bio 7N, so students enrolled in the former should not take this course. Open to undergraduates and graduate students. Students must have access to a DSLR camera and lenses - we can accept up to 20 students who can share 10 course-provided cameras and lenses, by application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 62: Experimental strategy and the bacterial world

Microbiology is a major foundation of all modern biology. Many aspects of experimental strategy, logic, and analysis originated in the fields of bacterial genetics and physiology. In BIO 62, we will use prokaryotic biology to review fundamentals of molecular biology and energetics, and in lab work we will work with experimental design and data interpretation. Research on prokaryotes has greatly expanded through genomic and population analysis, and we will use these approaches to ask questions about the hidden worlds around and inside us: the microbiome. Prerequisites: None. This course is not appropriate for students who received a 4 or 5 in AP biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Long, S. (PI)

BIO 86: Cell Biology

This course will focus on the basic structures inside cells and how they execute cellular functions. Topics include organelles, membrane trafficking, the cytoskeleton, cell division, and signal transduction. Classic and recent primary literature will be incorporated into lectures with an emphasis on state of the art experimental approaches. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 105B: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (EARTHSYS 105B)

Formerly 96B - Jasper Ridge Docent Training. First of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wilber, C. (PI)

BIO 107: Human Physiology Laboratory (HUMBIO 136)

This laboratory course is active and inquiry based. Aspects of exercise and temperature are explored; however, the specific questions the class tackles differ each quarter. Samples of past questions: Does lactic acid accumulation correlate with exercise fatigue at different exercise and body temperatures? Does palm cooling during exercise mitigate the effect of body temperature on fatigue with or without evaporative cooling? Students participate both as experimenters and as subjects of the experiments in two-person teams. Participants must be in good physical condition, though not necessarily athletes, and must be willing to participate in strenuous exercise routines under adverse environmental conditions. Varsity athletes concurrently participating in a spring sport must consult the instructor before applying. Discussion sessions include student presentations of journal articles, data analyses, and feedback on individual WIM research proposals. By application only, see sites.stanford.edu/bio107humbio136 for the application form. Prerequisite: Bio 42 or HumBio 4A. Satisfies WIM for Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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