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201 - 210 of 281 results for: all courses

MATH 83N: Proofs and Modern Mathematics

How do mathematicians think? Why are the mathematical facts learned in school true? In this course students will explore higher-level mathematical thinking and will gain familiarity with a crucial aspect of mathematics: achieving certainty via mathematical proofs, a creative activity of figuring out what should be true and why. This course is ideal for students who would like to learn about the reasoning underlying mathematical results, but at a pace and level of abstraction not as intense as Math 61CM/DM, as a consequence benefiting from additional opportunity to explore the reasoning. Familiarity with one-variable calculus is strongly recommended at least at the AB level of AP Calculus since a significant part of the seminar develops develops some of the main results in that material systematically from a small list of axioms. We also address linear algebra from the viewpoint of a mathematician, illuminating algebraic notions such as groups, rings, and fields. This seminar may be paired with Math 51; though that course is not a pre- or co-requisite.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 87Q: Mathematics of Knots, Braids, Links, and Tangles

Preference to sophomores. Types of knots and how knots can be distinguished from one another by means of numerical or polynomial invariants. The geometry and algebra of braids, including their relationships to knots. Topology of surfaces. Brief summary of applications to biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 82N: Science of the Impossible

Imagine a world where cancer is cured with light, objects can be made invisible, and teleportation is allowed through space and time. The future once envisioned by science fiction writers is now becoming a reality, thanks to advances in materials science and engineering. This seminar will explore 'impossible' technologies - those that have shaped our past and those that promise to revolutionize the future. Attention will be given to both the science and the societal impact of these technologies. We will begin by investigating breakthroughs from the 20th century that seemed impossible in the early 1900s, such as the invention of integrated circuits and the discovery of chemotherapy. We will then discuss the scientific breakthroughs that enabled modern 'impossible' science, such as photodynamic cancer therapeutics, invisibility, and psychokinesis through advanced mind-machine interfaces. Lastly, we will explore technologies currently perceived as completely impossible and brainstorm the breakthroughs needed to make such science fiction a reality. The course will include introductory lectures and in-depth conversations based on readings. Students will also be given the opportunity to lead class discussions on a relevant 'impossible science' topic of their choosing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dionne, J. (PI)

MATSCI 83N: Great Inventions That Matter

This introductory seminar starts by illuminating on the general aspects of creativity, invention, and patenting in engineering and medicine, and how Stanford University is one of the world's foremost engines of innovation. We then take a deep dive into some great technological inventions which are still playing an essential role in our everyday lives, such as fiber amplifier, digital compass, computer memory, HIV detector, personal genome machine, cancer cell sorting, brain imaging, and mind reading. The stories and underlying materials and technologies behind each invention, including a few examples by Stanford faculty and student inventors, are highlighted and discussed. A special lecture focuses on the public policy on intellectual properties (IP) and the resources at Stanford Office of Technology Licensing (OTL). Each student will have an opportunity to present on a great invention from Stanford (or elsewhere), or to write a (mock) patent disclosure of his/her own ideas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

MATSCI 85N: Health Fab: Making Stuff for Life

Semiconductor-based chip technology is all around us; in our phones, computers, and cars. However, not all capabilities developed for silicon processing are directed towards computers and mobile devices. A new field has emerged using these fabrication and patterning techniques for medical devices, health monitoring, and human-machine interfaces. We can now create chips that flow not electrons, but liquids, taking samples and performing analyses. These liquid based functions can be integrated together with silicon electronic devices for sensing, control, or manipulation. FitBits and Apple Watches are examples of the first generation of 'wearable' electronics, while more advanced devices that incorporate both liquid based sensors and electronics are on their way.nnIn this class, we will learn some fundamentals of device fabrication for biomedical purposes, take you inside the Stanford NanoFabrication Facility (SNF), and create microfluidic devices. We will cover what is possible with cur more »
Semiconductor-based chip technology is all around us; in our phones, computers, and cars. However, not all capabilities developed for silicon processing are directed towards computers and mobile devices. A new field has emerged using these fabrication and patterning techniques for medical devices, health monitoring, and human-machine interfaces. We can now create chips that flow not electrons, but liquids, taking samples and performing analyses. These liquid based functions can be integrated together with silicon electronic devices for sensing, control, or manipulation. FitBits and Apple Watches are examples of the first generation of 'wearable' electronics, while more advanced devices that incorporate both liquid based sensors and electronics are on their way.nnIn this class, we will learn some fundamentals of device fabrication for biomedical purposes, take you inside the Stanford NanoFabrication Facility (SNF), and create microfluidic devices. We will cover what is possible with current microfabrication techniques, including direct-write lithography, laser cutting, three-dimensional two photon patterning, polymer deposition and metal patterning. Students will learn how to design, fabricate, and test microfluidic and biomedically related devices. In addition to teaching and hands-on training in microfluidic fabrication, the class will include four team-based projects, each with a different device goal. These projects requirements will be submitted by leading research groups at Stanford, providing up-to-date and real world challenges. Each team will work together to identify specific device needs, invent solutions, and built prototype devices. At the end of the course each team will present its designs to the sponsoring research program and describe how they met the required objectives. No prior experience with device fabrication is needed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Melosh, N. (PI)

MATSCI 159Q: Japanese Companies and Japanese Society (ENGR 159Q)

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sinclair, R. (PI)

ME 22N: Smart Robots in our Mix: Collaborating in High Tech Environments of Tomorrow

This course invites students to explore rules of engagement in a global digitally interconnected world they will create with the robots in their society. The material will be taught in the context of ubiquitous integrated technology that will be part of their future reality. Human-robot interactions will be an integral part of future diverse teams. Students will explore what form will this interaction take as an emerging element of tomorrow's society, be it medical implanted technology or the implications of military use of robots and social media in future society. Students will learn to foster their creative confidence to explore collaboration by differences for social innovation in a digitally networked world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Waldron, K. (PI)

MED 50N: Translational Research: Turning Science into Medicine

Investigates how scientific research informs how physicians take care of patients and how clinical research informs how scientific experiments are conducted. Topics include how these two processes have improved health and have resulted in innovation and scientic progress; specific human disease areas in allergy and immunology that affect all ages of patients globally, including food allergy; scientific concepts of research that helped in discovery of novel diagnostics and treatment of disease; ethical roles of physicians and scientists in conducting translational research in human disease.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 51Q: Compassionate presence at the bedside: A palliative practicum

This is a Community Engaged Learning course for undergraduate students at all levels. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagements of patients within the context of chronic and serious illness(es). The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using the bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of palliative care, how modern medicine has altered the dying experience, and the cost implications of end-of-life care. They will be exposed to the challenges faced by the family members of dying patients, caregiver stress and bereavement. The class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing hospice volunteer training, eac more »
This is a Community Engaged Learning course for undergraduate students at all levels. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagements of patients within the context of chronic and serious illness(es). The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using the bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of palliative care, how modern medicine has altered the dying experience, and the cost implications of end-of-life care. They will be exposed to the challenges faced by the family members of dying patients, caregiver stress and bereavement. The class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing hospice volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular house calls on patients in their panel, and write progress notes, which will become a part of the patients' electronic medical records. Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults and seriously ill patients in an effective and compassionate manner. Students will be taught to discuss their panel of patients in class every week using the standard medical clinical rounds approach. Weekly assignments will help students reflect on their interactions with the patients and lessons they learned. Our goal is to train future leaders in the fields of healthcare, law, sociology, public policy, and humanities in the vital area of aging and end-of-life care for diverse Americans.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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