2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

71 - 80 of 154 results for: ECON

ECON 181: Honors Information and Incentives

Rigorous introduction to the theory of economic mechanisms under asymmetric information. Covers applications to price discrimination, taxation, regulation, long-term relationships, single-unit and multi-unit auctions. Forms a sequence with ECON 180 and ECON 182, but can be taken independently. Prerequisite: Experience with abstract mathematics and willingness to work hard. No prior knowledge of economics is required, although basic knowledge in game theory is useful.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Segal, I. (PI)

ECON 182: Honors Market Design

Rigorous introduction to the theory of matching and resource allocation, and its application to practical market design. Theory covers two-sided matching, "house allocation" problems, random assignment, and their variants. Applied topics include school choice, labor market, house allocation, and organ allocation for transplantation. Final paper required.nForms a sequence with ECON 180 and ECON 181, but can be taken independently.nPrerequisites: Experience with abstract mathematics and willingness tonwork hard. No prior knowledge of economics is required, although basic knowledge in game theory is useful.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kojima, F. (PI)

ECON 183: The Cardinal Fund

This is an experiential course that will cover the important concepts that underlying investment theory in Financial Economics. Students will manage an investment portfolio of at least $1 million dollars. In doing so they will learn how risk and return are related in public capital markets. Students are expected to spend a substantial amount of time outside the classroom applying the knowledge they learn in the class. Prerequisites: Econ 51 (or IPS 204A, PublPol 301A), Econ 102B (or Stats 141, Stats 110, CEE 203, Earthsys 160, Educ 200C, Linguist 277, Psych 252), Econ 140 (or Econ 135), Econ 190 (or MS&E 140)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 190: Introduction to Financial Accounting

How to read, understand, and use corporate financial statements. Oriented towards the use of financial accounting information (rather than the preparer), and emphasizes the reconstruction of economic events from published accounting reports.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 191: Introduction to Cost Accounting

Focuses on how managers use accounting information for decision making. Students will study product and service costing, activity based costing, performance management and evaluation, CVP analysis, forecasting, factors to be considered in pricing decision, capital investment analysis, and quality management and measurement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 198: Junior Honors Seminar (PUBLPOL 197)

Primarily for students who expect to write an honors thesis. Weekly sessions go through the process of selecting a research question, finding relevant bibliography, writing a literature review, introduction, and study design, culminating in the write-up of an honors thesis proposal (prospectus) and the oral presentation of each student¿s research project. Students also select an adviser and outline a program of study for their senior year. Enrollment limited to 15.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 199D: Honors Thesis Research

In-depth study of an appropriate question and completion of a thesis of very high quality. Normally written under the direction of a member of the Department of Economics (or some closely related department). See description of honors program. Register for at least 1 unit for at least one quarter after your honors application is approved. Winter registration for one unit under the supervision of the Director of the Honors Program is mandatory for all honors students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Abramitzky, R. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Alsan, M. (PI) ; Amador, M. (PI) ; Amemiya, T. (PI) ; Aoki, M. (PI) ; Arora, A. (PI) ; Arrow, K. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Attanasio, O. (PI) ; Bagwell, K. (PI) ; Bekaert, G. (PI) ; Bernheim, B. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Bloom, N. (PI) ; Boskin, M. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Bresnahan, T. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Canellos, C. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Chandrasekhar, A. (PI) ; Chaudhary, L. (PI) ; Chetty, R. (PI) ; Clerici-Arias, M. (PI) ; Cogan, J. (PI) ; David, P. (PI) ; DeGiorgi, G. (PI) ; Dickstein, M. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Duggan, M. (PI) ; Dupas, P. (PI) ; Einav, L. (PI) ; Fafchamps, M. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fitzgerald, D. (PI) ; Fitzpatrick, M. (PI) ; Fong, K. (PI) ; Fuchs, V. (PI) ; Garber, A. (PI) ; Gentzkow, M. (PI) ; Goda, G. (PI) ; Gould, A. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Greif, A. (PI) ; Haber, S. (PI) ; Hall, R. (PI) ; Hammond, P. (PI) ; Hansen, P. (PI) ; Hanson, W. (PI) ; Hanushek, E. (PI) ; Harding, M. (PI) ; Harris, D. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Henry, P. (PI) ; Hong, H. (PI) ; Hope, N. (PI) ; Hoxby, C. (PI) ; Jackson, M. (PI) ; Jagolinzer, A. (PI) ; Jaimovich, N. (PI) ; Jayachandran, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Judd, K. (PI) ; Kastl, J. (PI) ; Kehoe, P. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Klenow, P. (PI) ; Kochar, A. (PI) ; Kojima, F. (PI) ; Kolstad, C. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kuran, T. (PI) ; Kurlat, P. (PI) ; Kurz, M. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larsen, B. (PI) ; Lau, L. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Levin, J. (PI) ; Loeb, S. (PI) ; MaCurdy, T. (PI) ; Mahajan, A. (PI) ; Manova, K. (PI) ; McClellan, M. (PI) ; McKinnon, R. (PI) ; Meier, G. (PI) ; Milgrom, P. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Morten, M. (PI) ; Moser, P. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Niederle, M. (PI) ; Noll, R. (PI) ; Owen, B. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Pencavel, J. (PI) ; Piazzesi, M. (PI) ; Pistaferri, L. (PI) ; Polinsky, A. (PI) ; Qian, Y. (PI) ; Rangel, A. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Richards, J. (PI) ; Roberts, J. (PI) ; Romano, J. (PI) ; Romer, P. (PI) ; Rosenberg, N. (PI) ; Rosston, G. (PI) ; Roth, A. (PI) ; Rothwell, G. (PI) ; Rozelle, S. (PI) ; Scheuer, F. (PI) ; Schneider, M. (PI) ; Segal, I. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Shoven, J. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sprenger, C. (PI) ; Staiger, R. (PI) ; Stanton, F. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Tendall, M. (PI) ; Tertilt, M. (PI) ; Wacziarg, R. (PI) ; Weingast, B. (PI) ; Wilson, R. (PI) ; Wolak, F. (PI) ; Wolitzky, A. (PI) ; Wright, G. (PI) ; Wright, M. (PI) ; Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 202: Microeconomics I

(Non-Economics graduate students register for 202N.) Open to advanced undergraduates with consent of instructors. Theory of the consumer and the implications of constrained maximization; uses of indirect utility and expenditure functions; theory of the producer, profit maximization, and cost minimization; behavior under uncertainty; partial equilibrium analysis and introduction to models of general equilibrium. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: thorough understanding of the elements of multivariate calculus and linear algebra.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 202N: Microeconomics I For Non-Economics PhDs

Microeconomics I for non-Economics PhD students. Theory of the consumer and the implications of constrained maximization; uses of indirect utility and expenditure functions; theory of the producer, profit maximization, and cost minimization; behavior under uncertainty; partial equilibrium analysis and introduction to models of general equilibrium. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: understanding of the elements of multivariate calculus and linear algebra.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 203: Microeconomics II

(Non-Economics graduate students register for 203N.) Non-cooperative game theory including normal and extensive forms, solution concepts, games with incomplete information, and repeated games. Externalities and public goods. The theory of imperfect competition: static Bertrand and Cournot competition, dynamic oligopoly, entry decisions, entry deterrence, strategic behavior to alter market conditions. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ECON 202.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints