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1 - 10 of 158 results for: LAW

LAW 203: Constitutional Law

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. This course offers an introduction to American constitutional law. In addition to examining questions of interpretive method, the course focuses on the powers of the federal government and the allocation of decision making authority among government institutions, including both federalism and separation of powers. Class participation, attendance, written assignments, and final exam. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 217: Property

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It deals with possession and ownership of land and with the incidents thereof, including private and public restrictions on its use and development, nuisance, trespass, concurrent interests, landlord and tenant, and eminent domain. Attendance and final exam. Your instructor will advise you of other basis of grading. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 224A: Federal Litigation in a Global Context: Coursework

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated global torts case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and transnational lawyering. Elements used in grading: attendance, class participation, oral argument, assignments in preparation for written briefs (outlines, drafts, research and citation assignments), written briefs, and professionalism. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. A petition must indicate whether the product is intended for publication in a law review or elsewhere. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising more »
Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. A petition must indicate whether the product is intended for publication in a law review or elsewhere. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track. See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. With the approval of the instructor, a directed research project of two-units or more may satisfy one research writing course (R course). Elements used in grading: As agreed to by instructor. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements Used in Grading: Paper
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements Used in Grading: Paper
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F
Instructors: Gordon, R. (PI)

LAW 411: Directed Writing

Teams of students may earn "Directed Writing" credit for collaborative problems involving professional writing, such as briefs, proposed legislation or other legal writing. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has discretion to make the final page-length determination. Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 681J: Discussion: When Bad Things are Done by Good People

Some people live their lives in a manner that would lead few to declare them good people. From Tony Soprano to Saddam Hussein to Bernie Madoff, we are all familiar with individuals who have made crime and violence a constant in their lives. There are far more people, though, who try generally to live good lives, but find themselves having acted or having failed to act in ways that are widely condemned as evil. In the first four of our five meetings, we will be looking (through some books, reports and films) at case studies of such circumstances, including (a) those in authority who have covered up evidence of sexual abuse; (b) prosecutors who have ignored evidence of a defendant's innocence, (c) lawyers who have turned blind eyes to client misconduct, and (d) soldiers who have committed acts they would have once found unimaginable. In our fifth session we will consider contrasting case studies of individuals who resisted great pressure and kept their moral compasses well-calibrated. Throughout our inquiry, we will reflect in particular on the power of institutions and authority in affecting ethical mores. Winter Quarter. Class meeting dates: Five Wednesday Evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. (precise dates TBD). DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students and then see Consent of Instructor Forms). See Ranking Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Marshall, L. (PI)

LAW 681U: Discussion: Injuries

Very generally speaking, we try, as individuals, to avoid injuring people and, collectively, to adopt policies that minimize injury, in the sense that we don't want to make people worse off, in some hedonic sense, or deprive them of options or capacities that we think they ought to have. Moreover, our legal system frequently compensates people who are injured (and therefore must ascertain if, and how badly, they are injured.)What we get the chance to investigate and discuss in this discussion group is what we mean when we say that people are injured by some particular practices or outcomes that might seem, without much reflection, to be obviously injurious. More particularly, we will discuss five issues: (1) In our first session, we will work out the implications of an academic literature that seems to explore what I see to be one of the finest of one-line jokes ("Nothing matters, and what if it did?"). The literature on hedonic adaptation might seem to suggest that we can neither inju more »
Very generally speaking, we try, as individuals, to avoid injuring people and, collectively, to adopt policies that minimize injury, in the sense that we don't want to make people worse off, in some hedonic sense, or deprive them of options or capacities that we think they ought to have. Moreover, our legal system frequently compensates people who are injured (and therefore must ascertain if, and how badly, they are injured.)What we get the chance to investigate and discuss in this discussion group is what we mean when we say that people are injured by some particular practices or outcomes that might seem, without much reflection, to be obviously injurious. More particularly, we will discuss five issues: (1) In our first session, we will work out the implications of an academic literature that seems to explore what I see to be one of the finest of one-line jokes ("Nothing matters, and what if it did?"). The literature on hedonic adaptation might seem to suggest that we can neither injure others nor improve their lots: very quickly, people return to a (generally mildly positive) fixed equilibrium state even when seemingly very good or very bad things happen to them. We will explore the literature and its limits. (2) In the final four sessions, we will explore four conditions or practices that seem intuitively injurious and problematic and try to figure out more precisely what might be bad about them, or whether they are actually injurious in the ways that we might at first think: we will explore what is injurious about poverty, discrimination, sexual harassment, and even the big one, death. Begin in Winter Quarter and run through Spring Quarter. Class times will be determined: 3 in winter and 2 in spring, on an evening that works for all those enrolled. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Kelman, M. (PI)

LAW 682A: Discussion: Authoritarianisms

What is authoritarianism? What is the authoritarian personality? In what social, psychological, economic, and political climates does authoritarianism take root and become an object of desire? In what ways does the rule of law bend to and even reflect authoritarian impulses? Although it is common to think of constitutionalism as anti-authoritarian, and of authoritarianism as anathema to constitutionalism (after all, what do formal legal "constraints" on state power inscribed in fundamental law mean in an authoritarian state -- a state free to act as it wishes?), in what ways and to what ends have authoritarian and quasi-authoritarian regimes relied on constitutional law and in what ways do authoritarian impulses manifest in supposedly liberal democratic regimes? Finally, and crucially for our purposes, what roles have lawyers played in erecting and resisting authoritarianism? In this reading group we will address these questions through a wide range of source material in law, history, more »
What is authoritarianism? What is the authoritarian personality? In what social, psychological, economic, and political climates does authoritarianism take root and become an object of desire? In what ways does the rule of law bend to and even reflect authoritarian impulses? Although it is common to think of constitutionalism as anti-authoritarian, and of authoritarianism as anathema to constitutionalism (after all, what do formal legal "constraints" on state power inscribed in fundamental law mean in an authoritarian state -- a state free to act as it wishes?), in what ways and to what ends have authoritarian and quasi-authoritarian regimes relied on constitutional law and in what ways do authoritarian impulses manifest in supposedly liberal democratic regimes? Finally, and crucially for our purposes, what roles have lawyers played in erecting and resisting authoritarianism? In this reading group we will address these questions through a wide range of source material in law, history, cognitive psychology, political theory, and fiction. Begin in Winter Quarter and run through Spring Quarter. Meeting Time: Tuesdays, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Meeting Dates: TBD. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance and active participation are requirements of the seminar.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
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