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1 - 8 of 8 results for: LATINAM ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LATINAM 197: Directed Individual Research

For students engaged in interdisciplinary work that cannot be arranged by department. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dirzo, R. (PI)

LATINAM 198: Honors Thesis

Restricted to those writing an honors thesis in Latin American Studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

LATINAM 200: Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Latin American Studies

Guest scholars present analyses of major Latin American themes. Restricted to students enrolled in the Latin American Studies MA program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Diaz, A. (PI)

LATINAM 210: Everyday Economic Life Among Brazil's Urban Poor

This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities experienced by Brazil's urban poor as they access consumer and financial markets.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

LATINAM 337A: Indigenous Peoples, Environment and Sustainability

"Why be concerned with indigenous peoples and their environments? After all, these people are few in number and have little influence on the environment." (Fragoso and Reo 2013). Many believe this statement to be true and suggest that indigenous societies are similar to other human societies in their relationships and impacts on the environment. Supporters of this view argue that extant indigenous people have transitioned or are transitioning into the dominant "westernized" world culture, negating any special relationship they may have had with biota and the environment. However, interactions among groups of people, biota, and geographies are inherently complex, making it difficult to tease apart reality from myth and sustainability from unsustainability. Through a series of lectures, readings, and discussions of case studies from the Americas and the world (with a slight focus on the Amazon) we will explore indigenous peoples views of and interactions with biota and the environment. W more »
"Why be concerned with indigenous peoples and their environments? After all, these people are few in number and have little influence on the environment." (Fragoso and Reo 2013). Many believe this statement to be true and suggest that indigenous societies are similar to other human societies in their relationships and impacts on the environment. Supporters of this view argue that extant indigenous people have transitioned or are transitioning into the dominant "westernized" world culture, negating any special relationship they may have had with biota and the environment. However, interactions among groups of people, biota, and geographies are inherently complex, making it difficult to tease apart reality from myth and sustainability from unsustainability. Through a series of lectures, readings, and discussions of case studies from the Americas and the world (with a slight focus on the Amazon) we will explore indigenous peoples views of and interactions with biota and the environment. We will also examine how culture influences ecology and sustainability and explore the tension that exists between science and traditional ways of knowing. nCourse will span two quarters (Winter and Spring) and students must enroll in both quarters. Winter course will meet for six weeks, beginning the week of February 6 through the end of the quarter. Grade will be given in Spring quarter. Students must complete a total of 5 units over the two quarters to complete the course.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LATINAM 337B: Indigenous Peoples, Environment, and Sustainability (Part II)

"Why be concerned with indigenous peoples and their environments? After all, these people are few in number and have little influence on the environment." (Fragoso and Reo 2013). Many believe this statement to be true and suggest that indigenous societies are similar to other human societies in their relationships and impacts on the environment. Supporters of this view argue that extant indigenous people have transitioned or are transitioning into the dominant "westernized" world culture, negating any special relationship they may have had with biota and the environment. However, interactions among groups of people, biota, and geographies are inherently complex, making it difficult to tease apart reality from myth and sustainability from unsustainability. Through a series of lectures, readings, and discussions of case studies from the Americas and the world (with a slight focus on the Amazon) we will explore indigenous peoples views of and interactions with biota and the environment. W more »
"Why be concerned with indigenous peoples and their environments? After all, these people are few in number and have little influence on the environment." (Fragoso and Reo 2013). Many believe this statement to be true and suggest that indigenous societies are similar to other human societies in their relationships and impacts on the environment. Supporters of this view argue that extant indigenous people have transitioned or are transitioning into the dominant "westernized" world culture, negating any special relationship they may have had with biota and the environment. However, interactions among groups of people, biota, and geographies are inherently complex, making it difficult to tease apart reality from myth and sustainability from unsustainability. Through a series of lectures, readings, and discussions of case studies from the Americas and the world (with a slight focus on the Amazon) we will explore indigenous peoples views of and interactions with biota and the environment. We will also examine how culture influences ecology and sustainability and explore the tension that exists between science and traditional ways of knowing. nCourse will span two quarters (Winter and Spring) and students must enroll in both quarters. Spring course will meet for four weeks, beginning the first week of the quarter. Grade will be given in Spring quarter. Students must enroll in a total of 5 units over the two quarters.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LATINAM 398: Master's Thesis

Restricted to students writing a master's thesis in Latin American Studies. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LATINAM 801: TGR Project

TGR Project for approved students in Latin American Studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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