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1 - 9 of 9 results for: KOREA ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

KOREA 101N: Kangnam Style: Korean Soft Power in the Global Economy

For over a decade now, South Korea has established itself as a tireless generator of soft power, the popularity of its pop-culture spreading from Asia to the rest of the world. This class will look into the economic engine that moves this "cultural contents" industry, and will examine some of its expressions in the form of K-pop. Class meets in East Asia Library (Lathrop Library), Rm 338.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zur, D. (PI)

KOREA 118: Humanities Core: Everybody Eats: The Language, Culture, and Ethics of Food in East Asia (CHINA 118, HUMCORE 22, JAPAN 118)

Many of us have grown up eating "Asian" at home, with friends, on special occasions, or even without full awareness that Asian is what we were eating. This course situates the three major culinary traditions of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--in the histories and civilizations of the region, using food as an introduction to their rich repertoires of literature, art, language, philosophy, religion, and culture. It also situates these seemingly timeless gastronomies within local and global flows, social change, and ethical frameworks. Specifically, we will explore the traditional elements of Korean court food, and the transformation of this cuisine as a consequence of the Korean War and South Korea¿s subsequent globalizing economy; the intersection of traditional Japanese food with past and contemporary identities; and the evolution of Chinese cuisine that accompanies shifting attitudes about the environment, health, and well-being. Questions we will ask ourselves during the quarter include, what is "Asian" about Asian cuisine? How has the language of food changed? Is eating, and talking about eating, a gendered experience? How have changing views of the self and community shifted the conversation around the ethics and ecology of meat consumption?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

KOREA 158: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional more »
This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

KOREA 198C: Senior Research (Capstone Essay)

EALC students writing a Senior Capstone Essay who wish to conduct research with their adviser may enroll in this course for 1 unit, for 1 quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Zur, D. (PI)

KOREA 198H: Senior Research (Honors Thesis)

EALC seniors or juniors pursuing honors research should sign up for this course under their faculty adviser for research credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zur, D. (PI)

KOREA 200: Directed Readings in Korean

Directed Reading in Korean Studies, requires instructor consent before enrolling.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zur, D. (PI)

KOREA 250: More Real than Fiction: nPerspectives of History and Theory in Modern Korean Literature (KOREA 350)

The past two decades have brought about a significant reassessment and new theoretical engagements with colonial and post-colonial Korean fiction. Colonial fiction has typically been read in binary terms: modernist/realist, resistant/collaborative, and political/escapist. In the postwar era, fiction has typically been viewed in frameworks that take into account fallouts from state developmentalism and division, the movements of bodies and capital, precarious social dynamics and gender politics. nThe purpose of this survey seminar will be to interrogate the relationship between Korean fiction and the social/political/economic conditions of its production. We will do so by reading novels and short fiction from the last century alongside recent scholarship from both within and outside the Korean studies field. While doing so, we will inquire into the efficacy of the area studies/Korean studies paradigm and investigate theoretical frameworks that might be applicable to Korean fiction in different periods. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zur, D. (PI)

KOREA 258: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (KOREA 158)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional more »
This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

KOREA 350: More Real than Fiction: nPerspectives of History and Theory in Modern Korean Literature (KOREA 250)

The past two decades have brought about a significant reassessment and new theoretical engagements with colonial and post-colonial Korean fiction. Colonial fiction has typically been read in binary terms: modernist/realist, resistant/collaborative, and political/escapist. In the postwar era, fiction has typically been viewed in frameworks that take into account fallouts from state developmentalism and division, the movements of bodies and capital, precarious social dynamics and gender politics. nThe purpose of this survey seminar will be to interrogate the relationship between Korean fiction and the social/political/economic conditions of its production. We will do so by reading novels and short fiction from the last century alongside recent scholarship from both within and outside the Korean studies field. While doing so, we will inquire into the efficacy of the area studies/Korean studies paradigm and investigate theoretical frameworks that might be applicable to Korean fiction in different periods. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zur, D. (PI)
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