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1 - 10 of 13 results for: EASTASN ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EASTASN 24: Traditional Japan through Ordinary Eyes: The Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Japan (EASTASN 224)

In the Tokugawa period (1603-1868), political power was restricted to members of the ruling class- the samurai, whose public possession of sword and surname distinguished them from the rest of the society. Yet the samurai accounted for only six percent of the population. How successful was the ruling class in exerting control over its subjects, and how did the people respond? How were power relations in the society determined- between ordinary people and elites, women and men, center and periphery? To what extent and in what way did the common people contribute to shape the cultural and social life in early modern Japan? By examining a variety of source materials written by commoners, including popular novels, peasant petitions, folktales, tourist maps, and woodblock prints, and by locating the cases discussed on historical maps, we will grapple with these questions. In the map/image exercise, we will see and touch real materials courtesy of the East Asia Library. In so doing, we will illuminate the world of ordinary people in Japan before the modern westernization through their own eyes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 97: The International Relations of Asia since World War II (EASTASN 297)

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 117: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 217)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 143: Taiwan's Democratic Evolution (EASTASN 243)

This course is an introduction to the contemporary politics of Taiwan. Once a poor, insecure autocracy, today Taiwan has been transformed into a prosperous and stable liberal democracy, albeit one whose long-term security remains imperiled by the rising power of the People's Republic of China. We will draw on concepts and theories from political science to explore distinct aspects of this ongoing political evolution, including the transition to and consolidation of democracy, origins and trajectory of economic and social development, sources of Taiwanese nationalism, security of the Taiwanese state and its relationship to the PRC and the United States, parties and elections, and public policy processes and challenges.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 189K: The Diplomatic and Security Challenges for Korea (EASTASN 289K)

With strong nationalistic leadership in the US, China, Russia and Japan, and the ongoing North Korea problems, Korea (i.e. South Korea) faces daunting challenges of its foreign and security policies. As changing circumstances continue to shape Korea's relations with its major neighboring countries as well as with the United States, this course will examine pragmatic and practical issues to understand the complexities and challenges in establishing sustainable peace and stability on the Korean peninsula as well as in Northeast Asia. The topics discussed in the class will include the North Korean nuclear threat, China-North Korea relations, territorial and historical issues, and the reunification process.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kim, K. (PI)

EASTASN 217: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 117)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 224: Traditional Japan through Ordinary Eyes: The Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Japan (EASTASN 24)

In the Tokugawa period (1603-1868), political power was restricted to members of the ruling class- the samurai, whose public possession of sword and surname distinguished them from the rest of the society. Yet the samurai accounted for only six percent of the population. How successful was the ruling class in exerting control over its subjects, and how did the people respond? How were power relations in the society determined- between ordinary people and elites, women and men, center and periphery? To what extent and in what way did the common people contribute to shape the cultural and social life in early modern Japan? By examining a variety of source materials written by commoners, including popular novels, peasant petitions, folktales, tourist maps, and woodblock prints, and by locating the cases discussed on historical maps, we will grapple with these questions. In the map/image exercise, we will see and touch real materials courtesy of the East Asia Library. In so doing, we will illuminate the world of ordinary people in Japan before the modern westernization through their own eyes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 243: Taiwan's Democratic Evolution (EASTASN 143)

This course is an introduction to the contemporary politics of Taiwan. Once a poor, insecure autocracy, today Taiwan has been transformed into a prosperous and stable liberal democracy, albeit one whose long-term security remains imperiled by the rising power of the People's Republic of China. We will draw on concepts and theories from political science to explore distinct aspects of this ongoing political evolution, including the transition to and consolidation of democracy, origins and trajectory of economic and social development, sources of Taiwanese nationalism, security of the Taiwanese state and its relationship to the PRC and the United States, parties and elections, and public policy processes and challenges.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 289K: The Diplomatic and Security Challenges for Korea (EASTASN 189K)

With strong nationalistic leadership in the US, China, Russia and Japan, and the ongoing North Korea problems, Korea (i.e. South Korea) faces daunting challenges of its foreign and security policies. As changing circumstances continue to shape Korea's relations with its major neighboring countries as well as with the United States, this course will examine pragmatic and practical issues to understand the complexities and challenges in establishing sustainable peace and stability on the Korean peninsula as well as in Northeast Asia. The topics discussed in the class will include the North Korean nuclear threat, China-North Korea relations, territorial and historical issues, and the reunification process.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kim, K. (PI)

EASTASN 297: The International Relations of Asia since World War II (EASTASN 97)

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)
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