2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 60 results for: BIO

BIO 7N: Introduction to Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 15N: Environmental Literacy

Preference to freshmen. Lack of public understanding of the details of most environmental problems is cited as a cause of environmental deterioration. Good citizenship requires literacy about the elements of the scientific and decision making processes that accompany most environmental issues: what can happen, what are the odds, how can the credibility of sources of expertise be assessed, which components of environmental debates deal with factual and theoretical issues, and which are political value judgments?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Root, T. (PI)

BIO 21: The Science of the Extreme Life of the Sea

Based on the book Extreme Life of the Sea, this course will explore the new science about how marine species thrive in some of the world's most difficult environments. Species that live in the hottest, coldest, deepest and shallowest habitats will be described along with the genetic, biochemical, physiological and behavioral adaptations that allow them to persist. We will also examine the fastest, the oldest, the most archaic, the smallest, biggest and the most numerous species. Emphasis will be on the scientific discoveries about these species that give insight into their lives.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 25Q: The Molecular Basis of Genetic Disease

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on two genetic diseases resulting from the production of protein molecules that are unable to fold into their native conformations, called conformational diseases: cystic fibrosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's disease. Hypotheses and controversies surrounding the molecular basis of these disorders, and implications for novel therapeutics. Readings from research literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 26N: Maintenance of the Genome

Preference to freshmen. The precious blueprint for life is entrusted to the genomic DNA molecules in all living cells. Multiple strategies have evolved to prevent the deleterious consequences from endogenous DNA alterations and damage from radiation or genotoxic chemicals in the environment. In this seminar you will learn about the remarkable systems that scan cellular DNA for alterations and make repairs to ensure genomic stability. Deficiencies in DNA repair have been implicated in many hereditary diseases involving developmental defects, premature aging, and/or predisposition to cancer. An understanding of DNA repair mechanisms is important for advances in the fields of cancer biology, neurobiology, and gerontology. Background readings, introductory lectures, student presentations, short term paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hanawalt, P. (PI)

BIO 29N: Party with Trees

Ever marveled at the imposing trees around campus? This course will explore trees on campus using Bracewell's marvelous "Trees of Stanford" as a rough guide. We will develop tools and explore ideas that will allow the wider community to cherish and appreciate the oft-neglected trees on campus. The course will include guest lectures that focus on the theme of trees: from literature to the physics and biology of trees, to the environmental impact of global forest loss.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bhaya, D. (PI)

BIO 42: Cell Biology and Animal Physiology

Cell structure and function; principles of animal physiology (immunology, renal, cardiovascular, sensory, motor physiology, and endocrinology); neurobiology from cellular basis to neural regulation of physiology. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X (or 31A,B), 33. Recommended: BIO 41; CHEM 35; MATH 19, 20, 21 or 41, 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 42A: Bio Solve-It

Students enrolled in Bio42 lecture and regular discussion sections attend an additional 75 min section. The objective of the course is to help students to solidify basic concepts, identify areas to work on, and apply core concepts learned that week in Bio42 lecture and section. Space is limited, by application only. Application deadline is December 12, 2014. Co-Requisite: Bio 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 44X: Core Molecular Biology Laboratory

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as a tumor suppressor through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of wild type and mutant p53 proteins. Formulate a testable hypothesis and assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, formulate further analyses to determine whether mutant p53 is present in the cell, can bind to DNA, and/or can enter the nucleus. Conduct lab experiments, present findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X, or 31A,B, and 33; concurrent or past enrollment in Biology or Human Biology core. 44X,Y should be taken sequentially in the same year, preferably as sophomores, to prepare for internships. Preference given to juniors and seniors in fall quarter, preference given to sophomores in winter quarter. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 104: Advanced Molecular Biology (BIO 200)

Molecular mechanisms that govern the replication, recombination, and expression of eukaryotic genomes. Topics: DNA replication, DNA recombination, gene transcription, RNA splicing, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein folding. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1. Prerequisite: Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints