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1 - 10 of 11 results for: OIT ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

OIT 262: Operations

This course focuses on basic managerial issues arising in the operations of both manufacturing and service industries. The objectives of the course are to familiarize students with the problems and issues confronting operations managers and to introduce language, conceptual models, and analytical techniques that are broadly applicable in confronting such problems. The spectrum of different process types used to provide goods and services is developed and then examined through methods of process analysis and design.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 269: MSx: Operations and Strategies

Operations refer to the processes in which businesses use to produce and deliver products or services. They can also be processes in which businesses use to support the functioning of the company. These processes consume materials, require resources such as assets or people, and take time for completion. Managing operations well is necessary in order that these processes can be completed in a timely manner, consume the right amount of resources and costs, and achieve the optimal purpose. This course is about (1) the concepts and methods in which operations can be managed effectively, and (2) how to develop strategies around operations.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Lee, H. (PI)

OIT 272: Online Marketplaces

How does Uber match drivers to passengers? How does Airbnb select the set of listings to show to a guest in a search? How does eBay manage trust and reputation between buyers and sellers? How does Google optimize auctions for billions of dollars’ worth of online advertising? This course focuses on the basic analytic and data science tools used to address these and other challenges encountered in the most exciting online marketplaces in the world. With hands-on exercises we will open and understand the “black-box” of online marketplaces’ operations. We will cover application areas such as transportation, rentals, sharing, e-commerce, labor markets, and advertising, leveraging tools from D&D, OSM, and Micro (all base). Overall, the course will provide basic business knowledge for future investors, product managers, sales and marketing managers, operation managers, and anyone interested on online marketplaces.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 334: Design for Extreme Affordability

This course is a Bass Seminar. Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product or service prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that meet that challenges faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see http://extreme.stanford.edu/index.html for details.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 364: Global Operations

Globalization of businesses has resulted in companies having to manage global networks of suppliers, integrators, contract manufacturers, logistics service providers, distributors, and service support operators in geographically dispersed locations. The customer network is also globally distributed. This course will focus on (1) how global and international companies can overcome the geographical, cultural, and organizational barriers, and leverage the strengths of the network to create values, and (2) how these companies may use different ways to manage operations in different regions to take full advantage of the local strengths and limitations. The course will be based on cases on innovative strategies and tactics used by global and international companies.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 385: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by more »
In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 691: PhD Directed Reading (ACCT 691, FINANCE 691, GSBGEN 691, HRMGT 691, MGTECON 691, MKTG 691, OB 691, POLECON 691, STRAMGT 691)

This course is offered for students requiring specialized training in an area not covered by existing courses. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the reading.
Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

OIT 692: PhD Dissertation Research (ACCT 692, FINANCE 692, GSBGEN 692, HRMGT 692, MGTECON 692, MKTG 692, OB 692, POLECON 692, STRAMGT 692)

This course is elected as soon as a student is ready to begin research for the dissertation, usually shortly after admission to candidacy. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the research.
Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

OIT 698: Doctoral Practicum in Teaching

Doctoral Practicum in Teaching
Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 699: Doctoral Practicum in Research

Doctoral Practicum in Research
Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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