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1 - 10 of 18 results for: JEWISHST ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

JEWISHST 5B: Biblical Greek (CLASSICS 7G)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 6) This is a continuation of the Winter Quarter Biblical Greek Course. Pre-requisite: CLASSICS 6G (Formerly CLASSGRK 5) or a similar introductory course in Ancient Greek.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 19N: Everyone Eats: Food, Religion and Culture (CSRE 19N, RELIGST 19N)

Food is one of the most essential aspects of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. In this seminar we will study how food habits have shaped religious traditions, and vice versa, how religious traditions have shaped food ways. Some traditions are centered around food regiments such as the dietary laws, derived from biblical law that shapes Jewish and Christian tradition very differently. Indeed, many religious and ethical thinkers, as well as anthropologists, have interpreted the meanings of the dietary laws very differently. Further, in many religious traditions the killing of animals and consumption of meat is deeply fraught. We will explore the history of food practices and their contemporary impact; the connections between food, religion, and identity; the meanings that religious thinkers and anthropologists have attributed to food habits; as well as the creative translations of religious traditions into contemporary food ethics by various social movements and groups, predominantly in the U.S..
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 84S: Between Toleration and Persecution: Iran and its Minorities in the Twentieth Century (HISTORY 84S)

What does it mean to be Jewish or Christian in a country where most citizens are categorized as Shi'i Muslims? How have Kurds and Azeris figured into Iranian national and political rhetoric? What has it meant to identify as transgender or transsexual? This course explores religious, ethnic, and sexual minority groups in Iran in the twentieth century. Topics include minority rights, identity formation, minorities¿ involvement in political movements, the impact of westernizing efforts on minorities, and the Iranian diaspora. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Farah, D. (PI)

JEWISHST 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability (CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 101C: First-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter (AMELANG 128C)

Continuation of AMELANG 128B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128B. Fulfill the University Foreign Language Requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 102C: Second-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter (AMELANG 129C)

Continuation of AMELANG 129B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 105: Hebrew Forum (AMELANG 131B)

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 127D: Readings in Talmudic Literature (JEWISHST 227D, RELIGST 170D)

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 139: Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism (FEMGEN 139)

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 147B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (COMPLIT 127B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)
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