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1 - 10 of 16 results for: IPS

IPS 201: Managing Global Complexity

Is international relations theory valuable for policy makers? The first half of the course will provide students with a foundation in theory by introducing the dominant theoretical traditions and insights in international relations. The second half of the course focuses on several complex global problems that cut across policy specializations and impact multiple policy dimensions. Students will assess the value of major theories and concepts in international relations for analyzing and addressing such complex global policy issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gould, E. (PI)

IPS 204B: Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers (PUBLPOL 301B)

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dee, T. (PI)

IPS 207: Economics of Corruption

The role of corruption in the growth and development experience of countries with a focus on the economics of corruption. Topics covered: the concept and measurement of corruption; theory and evidence on the impact of corruption on growth determinants and development outcomes, including public and private investment, financial flows, human capital accumulation, poverty and income inequality; the link between corruption and financial crises, including the recent crises in the US and the Eurozone; the cultural, economic, and political determinants of corruption; and policy measures for addressing corruption, including recent civil society initiatives and use of liberation technology.nPrerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 207B: Public Policy and Social Psychology: Implications and Applications (PSYCH 216, PUBLPOL 305B)

Theories, insights, and concerns of social psychology relevant to how people perceive issues, events, and each other, and links between beliefs and individual and collective behavior will be discussed with reference to a range of public policy issues including education, public health, income and wealth inequalities, and climate change, Specific topics include: situationist and subjectivist traditions of applied and theoretical social psychology; social comparison, dissonance, and attribution theories; stereotyping and stereotype threat, and sources of intergroup conflict and misunderstanding; challenges to universality assumptions regarding human motivation, emotion, and perception of self and others; also the general problem of producing individual and collective changes in norms and behavior.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ross, L. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 213: International Mediation and Civil Wars

This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh). In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 216: Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation

For any problem we want to solve - reducing poverty, improving education, ending civil wars, integrating refugee populations, increasing access to quality health care - someone has to take proposed solutions and make them stick. Course emphasis is on how to make change in the real world by focusing on policy implementation: what skilled leaders do when they engage stakeholders, confront opposition, prioritize goals, find and marshal resources, fail and learn, and succeed or not. In particular, the course will tackle problems that many policy courses ignore, such as why implementation is difficult and what strategies and capacities leaders need to put plans into actions. Focus will be on case analysis and discussion led by professors from a variety of different disciplinary backgrounds in economics, pediatrics, epidemiology, public health, and political science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 219: Intelligence and National Security

How intelligence supports U.S. national security and foreign policies. How it has been used by U.S. presidents to become what it is today; organizational strengths and weaknesses; how it is monitored and held accountable to the goals of a democratic society; and successes and failures. Current intelligence analyses and national intelligence estimates are produced in support of simulated policy deliberations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fingar, T. (PI)

IPS 224: Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia

This course explores East Asia¿s rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. However, rapid economic growth and development in East Asia was followed by economic stagnation and financial crisis. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, in particular, inequality, demography, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles. Prerequisite course: IPS 206, POLISCI 350B, ECON 102B, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

IPS 231A: Russia and the West (POLISCI 213A, REES 213A)

Today, American-Russian relations, and Russia¿s relations with West more generally, are tense and confrontational. One has to look deep into the Cold War to find a similar era of confrontation and competition. Yet, relations between Russia and the West were not always this way. The end of the Cold War, for instance, ushered in a period of cooperation. Back then, many believed that Russia was going to develop democratic and market institutions and integrate into Western international institutions. This seminar will examine various explanations for these variations in Russia¿s relations with the West, starting in the 19th century, and briefly examining the Cold War period, but a real focus on the last thirty years. In evaluating competing explanations. the course will focus on balance of power theories, culture, historical legacies, institutional design, and individual actors in both the United States (and sometimes Europe) and Russia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: McFaul, M. (PI)
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