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1 - 10 of 15 results for: IPS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

IPS 201: Managing Global Complexity

Is international relations theory valuable for policy makers? The first half of the course will provide students with a foundation in theory by introducing the dominant theoretical traditions and insights in international relations. The second half of the course focuses on several complex global problems that cut across policy specializations and impact multiple policy dimensions. Students will assess the value of major theories and concepts in international relations for analyzing and addressing such complex global policy issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gould, E. (PI)

IPS 204B: Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers (PUBLPOL 301B)

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dee, T. (PI)

IPS 207: Economics of Corruption

The role of corruption in the growth and development experience of countries with a focus on the economics of corruption. Topics covered: the concept and measurement of corruption; theory and evidence on the impact of corruption on growth determinants and development outcomes, including public and private investment, financial flows, human capital accumulation, poverty and income inequality; the link between corruption and financial crises, including the recent crises in the US and the Eurozone; the cultural, economic, and political determinants of corruption; and policy measures for addressing corruption, including recent civil society initiatives and use of liberation technology.nPrerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 207B: Public Policy and Social Psychology: Implications and Applications (PSYCH 216, PUBLPOL 305B)

Theories, insights, and concerns of social psychology relevant to how people perceive issues, events, and each other, and links between beliefs and individual and collective behavior will be discussed with reference to a range of public policy issues including education, public health, income and wealth inequalities, and climate change, Specific topics include: situationist and subjectivist traditions of applied and theoretical social psychology; social comparison, dissonance, and attribution theories; stereotyping and stereotype threat, and sources of intergroup conflict and misunderstanding; challenges to universality assumptions regarding human motivation, emotion, and perception of self and others; also the general problem of producing individual and collective changes in norms and behavior.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ross, L. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 210: The Politics of International Humanitarian Action

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 216: Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation

For any problem we want to solve - reducing poverty, improving education, ending civil wars, integrating refugee populations, increasing access to quality health care - someone has to take proposed solutions and make them stick. Course emphasis is on how to make change in the real world by focusing on policy implementation: what skilled leaders do when they engage stakeholders, confront opposition, prioritize goals, find and marshal resources, fail and learn, and succeed or not. In particular, the course will tackle problems that many policy courses ignore, such as why implementation is difficult and what strategies and capacities leaders need to put plans into actions. Focus will be on case analysis and discussion led by professors from a variety of different disciplinary backgrounds in economics, pediatrics, epidemiology, public health, and political science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 224: Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia

This course explores East Asia¿s rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. However, rapid economic growth and development in East Asia was followed by economic stagnation and financial crisis. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, in particular, inequality, demography, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles. Prerequisite course: IPS 206, POLISCI 350B, ECON 102B, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

IPS 242: American Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process (GLOBAL 220, POLISCI 217A)

This seminar will examine the tension in American foreign policy between pursuing U.S. security and economic interests and promoting American values abroad. The course will retrace the theoretical and ideological debates about values versus interests, with a particular focus on realism versus liberalism. The course will examine the evolution of these debates over time, starting with the French revolution, but with special attention given to the Cold War, American foreign policy after September 11th, and the Obama administration. The course also will examine how these contending theories and ideologies are mediated through the U.S. bureaucracy that shapes the making of foreign policy. ** NOTE: The enrollment of the class is by application only. Please provide a one page double-spaced document outlining previous associated coursework and why you want to enroll in the seminar to Anna Coll (acoll@stanford.edu) by February 22nd. Any questions related to this course can be directed to Anna Coll.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: McFaul, M. (PI)

IPS 246: China on the World Stage

China's reemergence as a global player is transforming both China and the international system. Other nations view China's rise with a mixture of admiration, anxiety, and opportunism. Some welcome China's rise as a potential counterweight to US preeminence; others fear the potential consequences of Sino-American rivalry and erosion of the US-led international system that has fostered unprecedented peace and prosperity. This course provides an overview of China's engagement with countries in all regions and on a wide range of issues since it launched the policy of opening and reform in 1978. The goal is to provide a broad overview and systematic comparisons across regions and issues, and to examine how China's global engagement has changed over time.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fingar, T. (PI)
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