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1 - 10 of 14 results for: DANCE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

DANCE 27: Faculty Choreography

Creation, rehearsal, performance of faculty choreography. Casting by audition/invitation. Repeatable for credit. For detailed project descriptions and full rehearsal/performance schedules, contact instructors directly. 2016-17 projects: AUTUMN: New Work by Diane Frank. International collaborators: composer Jarek Kapuscinski, sculptor Will Clift, Japanese master musician Ko Ishikawa. Large-scale sculptures provide a shifting landscape for sound and movement investigation of "ma," a Japanese aesthetic concept. Early February performances, Bing Concert Hall Atrium. Contact: dfrank1@stanford.edu. WINTER/SPRING: TAPS Main Stage production of "No Hero," a nationally-recognized multimedia work by choreographer Alex Ketley exploring what dance means to people throughout rural communities in the West. Rehearsals both Winter & Spring quarters, Tues/Thurs,6:30-8:30 pm. Main Stage performances end of Spring Quarter. Participation by invitation or audition. Please contact Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu for more details and questions.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 45: Dance Improv StratLab: Visual Performance in Art Spaces and Museums (AFRICAAM 45)

This class will explore art/artists on the fringe of of the visual arts, projecting their work through performance. Class will consist of visiting artists, short readings, field trips, and a culminating performance to take place in the Anderson Collection. Through the exploration of these cross-disciplinary projects, students will gain a better understanding of the history of performance art, specifically in visual arts spaces; meet practicing artists; visit galleries, museums, and alternative art spaces in the Bay Area; and explore the artistic strategies used in performance or body based disciplines in order to create new, innovative or transformative ways of being and doing. Embodied thinking and improvisation is the primary methodology through which creative strategies, processes and practices are applied in both art and non-art contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 46: Social Dance I

Introduction to non-competitive social ballroom dance. The partner dances found in today's popular culture include 3 kinds of swing, 3 forms of waltz, tango, salsa, cha-cha and nightclub two-step. The course also includes tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations. The emphasis on comfort, partnering and flexibility enables students to dance with partners whose experience comes from any dance tradition.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 106A: Embodied Resistance, Embodied Liberation: Performances of Blackness and the Black Experience

In this course we will examine dance and performing art practices that are rooted in the African American experience for social justice. Utilizing movement, writing and theater based practices we will explore the current issues that black Americans face in the struggles for joy, and racial, gender, and economic justice in the U.S.A. We will look at the work of black dance and performance artists from the period of the black power and black arts movements of the 1960s up to the present Black Lives Matters movement and examine how their performance work has served to catalyze and/or reinforce movements for justice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

DANCE 108: Hip Hop Meets Broadway

What happens when Hip Hop meets "Fosse", "Aida", "Dream Girls" and "In the Heights"?nThe most amazing collaboration of Hip Hop styles adapted to some of the most memorable Broadway Productions.nThis class will explore the realm between Hip Hop Dance and the Broadway Stage. Infusing Acting thru dance movement and exploring the Art of Lip Sync thru Hip Hop Dance styles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 129: Roots Modern Experience II (AFRICAAM 29)

In this course we will deepen our focus on many African and African diaspora movement traditions and their influences on Western contemporary dance with an emphasis on dance traditions of Cuba, Brazil, and Haiti. Our study of these dance disciplines will inform the movement vocabulary, technical training, class discussions, and choreography we experience in this course. Students will learn more about the dances and rhythms for the Orishas of Brazil and Cuba, and the Loa of Haiti with an additional focus on other African diaspora dance forms such as, house dance, salsa, Cuban Haitian, Palo, Samba and Samba-Reggae. Through our warm ups and class choreography, we will deepen our analysis of how African diaspora movement traditions are inherently embedded in many expressions of the broadly termed form known as contemporary dance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

DANCE 131: Beginning/Intermediate Ballet

Structured studio practice reviewing the basics of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps and ballet terms, and progressing to more complex positions and combination of steps. Emphasis is placed on improving forms, developing coordination and connectivity, securing balance, increasing strength, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DANCE 142: Intermediate/Advanced Contemporary Dance Technique

This intermediate/advanced dance technique class is grounded in the technical training, aesthetic sensibilities, and choreographic processes of Merce Cunningham, American dancer/master choreographer. This studio work at an intermediate/advanced level will build technical strength, speed, line, and rhythmic acuity/musicality and amplitude in dancing. The class will provides solid technical training useful and applicable to other forms of dancing. Dancers must be ready to work at an intermediate/advanced level to enroll. Studio practice will be supplemented by readings, video viewing, concert attendance, and participation in special workshops with guest artists. Though Cunningham-based dance technique is particularly well-suited to dancers with prior training in ballet, dancers with prior training in all forms of dance are welcome and strongly encouraged to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Frank, D. (PI)

DANCE 146: Social Dance II

Intermediate non-competitive social ballroom dance. The partner dances found in today's popular culture include Lindy hop, Viennese waltz, hustle, traveling foxtrot, plus intermediate/advanced levels of cross-step waltz and nightclub two-step. The course continues further tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations. Prerequisite: Dance 46.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 149: Advanced Ballet

Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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