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1 - 10 of 62 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CSRE 5I: Hamilton: An American Musical (AFRICAAM 5I, AMSTUD 5I, HISTORY 3G)

"Hamilton" is one the most popular and most celebrated musicals in American history. It has received 11 Tony Awards, including best musical, and 16 Tony nominations, the most nominations in Broadway history. It won the Pulitzer Prize and a Grammy Award. The musical draws on the language and rhythms of hip-hop and R & B, genres that are underrepresented in the musical theater tradition. "Hamilton" has redefined the American musical, particularly in terms of sound, casting, and storytelling. What explains the deep cultural impact and acclaim for this play?n nThis interdisciplinary course examines Alexander Hamilton and his world as well as Hamilton: An American Musical through a series of lectures from faculty in History, Theater and Performance Studies, English, Music, and Writing and Rhetoric.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

CSRE 21: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 27SI: Revolution and the Pilipinx Diaspora: Exploring Global Activism in Local Communities

This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to not only learn about current issues in the local Filipino American community, but also develop their own plans to take action on social justice issues. Through mediums of art and reflection, we will explore themes of diaspora and liberation by focusing on the Filipino experience and the local and vocal histories of activism in the Bay Area. We will be connecting local histories to the current global narrative while also connecting our past to our own identity formation as activists and community leaders. In doing so, we hope to explore the implications of local activism within the greater context of global organizing. The course will expose students to local community leaders and ways in which they can support and plug in to local initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

CSRE 32: Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective (ANTHRO 32)

This undergraduate course employs an anthropological and historical perspective to introduce students to ideas and concepts of race and ethnicity that emerged primarily in Europe and the United States in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and that continue to shape contemporary racial attitudes, interactions, and inequalities. Ideas about race and ethnicity forged outside the U.S. and case studies from other nations are presented to broaden students' understanding and to overcome the limitations of an exclusive focus on the U.S. This course is geared to sophomores and juniors who have already taken at least one course on race and ethnicity, anthropology, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Jewish Studies or Native American Studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 33SI: Examining Access for FLI Students in Higher Education

Stanford's past two presidents have steadfastly declared Stanford as a vehicle of upwards mobility and to correct inequalities. Essentially, this means providing sufficient access to students who often are most in need: first-generation and/or low-income (FLI) students. However, what exactly is access? How can we understand different kinds of access in order to improve the holistic quality of education students receive?nnTo answer these questions, we will define access and the forces which shape it, such as economic systems, intersectionality, and the educational pipeline. Next, to better prepare ourselves as advocates for educational improvement, we will examine the historical trend of access at colleges as case studies (Stanford, Berkeley, Foothills, and Brown). Finally, we will ask how accessibility influences how students fare after leaving the educational system.nnUltimately, we will gain analytical and heuristic techniques to pinpoint and advocate for improvements to educational access for FLI students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wolf, J. (PI)

CSRE 41: Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film (AFRICAAM 101, AMSTUD 101)

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books? NOTE: Students must attend the first day; admission to the class will be determined based on an in class essay.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mesa, C. (PI)

CSRE 51S: American Travel, Tourism and Empire in the Pacific, 1880s-1970s (AMSTUD 51S, HISTORY 51S)

What does it mean to be a traveler or a tourist? Is travel a form of empire or exploitation? Can it ever be an innocent form of economic and cultural exchange? This class will examine how cultures of travel and tourism helped everyday Americans understand and shape the country's political, social, and economic challenges from the 1880s to 1970s, as the U.S. evolved from a continental empire, into an overseas empire, and finally into an informal empire.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Yan, V. (PI)

CSRE 52H: I, Biologist: Diversity Improves the Science of Biology (BIO 52)

Disciplinary priorities, research agendas, and innovations are determined by the diversity of participants and problem-solving is more successful with a broad range of approaches. Using case studies in biological research, we propose to use these insights to help our students learn why a diverse scientific community leads to better discovery and improves the relevance of science to society. Our premise is that a diverse set of perspectives will impact not only how we learn science, but how we do science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 78: Art + Community: Division, Resilience & Reconciliation (AFRICAAM 78)

Violence and trauma isolates and segregates us. Part of the healing process must be about coming back into community. Freedom is meaningful only insofar as it lifts all, especially those who have been done the most harm. In times of violence and polarization, art can heal and brings people together. In this course, we will explore how we make and sustain community, especially in the face of threats from within and without. We will do this especially through examining how artists and culture workers of color develop and advance practices that build mutuality, criticality, renewal, trust, and joy in the face of ongoing racial injustice and cultural inequity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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