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1 - 10 of 49 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CSRE 3E: Michelle Obama in American Culture (AFRICAAM 3E, AMSTUD 3E, FEMGEN 3E, HISTORY 3E)

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 19N: Everyone Eats: Food, Religion and Culture (JEWISHST 19N, RELIGST 19N)

Food is one of the most essential aspects of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. In this seminar we will study how food habits have shaped religious traditions, and vice versa, how religious traditions have shaped food ways. Some traditions are centered around food regiments such as the dietary laws, derived from biblical law that shapes Jewish and Christian tradition very differently. Indeed, many religious and ethical thinkers, as well as anthropologists, have interpreted the meanings of the dietary laws very differently. Further, in many religious traditions the killing of animals and consumption of meat is deeply fraught. We will explore the history of food practices and their contemporary impact; the connections between food, religion, and identity; the meanings that religious thinkers and anthropologists have attributed to food habits; as well as the creative translations of religious traditions into contemporary food ethics by various social movements and groups, predominantly in the U.S..
Terms: not given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 35S: Sex, Race, and Nazism in 20th Century Germany (FEMGEN 35S, HISTORY 35S)

How can we make sense of race after Hitler? Although the Nazis' murderous attempts to engineer a racially pure society crumbled in 1945, Germany's dark past continues to influence today's heated debates about immigration, multiculturalism, Islamophobia, and right-wing extremism. Using various sources-- speeches, oral histories, memoirs, films, and rap music-- we will explore the experiences of historically persecuted groups: colonial subjects, Jews, homosexuals, women, Afro-Germans, Turkish immigrants, and Syrian refugees. All majors welcome. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kahn, M. (PI)

CSRE 44: Living Free: Embodying Healing and Creativity in The Era of Racial Justice Movements (AFRICAAM 144)

What does it mean to live free? It is often said that the one demand for the Movement for Black Lives is to "stop killing us." This demand has led Black artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies. This surge of creativity has impacted and intersected with work happening in queer and trans communities and in many other communities of color, including indigenous movements for safe and clean water, student protests against campus racism, the undocumented movement, prison abolition among others.  This justice based work urges us to interrupt systems of violence with systems of healing that recover traditions, invent new modalities, and connect to survival practices developed by many generations of people in community.nnIn this course we will bring together leading artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodie more »
What does it mean to live free? It is often said that the one demand for the Movement for Black Lives is to "stop killing us." This demand has led Black artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies. This surge of creativity has impacted and intersected with work happening in queer and trans communities and in many other communities of color, including indigenous movements for safe and clean water, student protests against campus racism, the undocumented movement, prison abolition among others.  This justice based work urges us to interrupt systems of violence with systems of healing that recover traditions, invent new modalities, and connect to survival practices developed by many generations of people in community.nnIn this course we will bring together leading artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies, land, and natural resources. In this course we ask: what does it mean to embody health? How can we shift frameworks of pathology into frameworks of wholeness? What practices can we develop, recover, and share that help us create systems that support and value equity, healing and creativity for communities most at risk? And finally, how can we all live free?
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Holt, A. (PI)

CSRE 52H: I, Biologist: Diversity Improves the Science of Biology (BIO 52)

Disciplinary priorities, research agendas, and innovations are determined by the diversity of participants and problem-solving is more successful with a broad range of approaches. Using case studies in biological research, we propose to use these insights to help our students learn why a diverse scientific community leads to better discovery and improves the relevance of science to society. Our premise is that a diverse set of perspectives will impact not only how we learn science, but how we do science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability (HISTORY 85B, JEWISHST 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 99: Housing Justice Research Lab (URBANST 187)

In this course, students will contribute to ongoing community-based research projects focused on housing justice in the Bay Area. Students will work directly with local community organizations working in advocacy, legal aid, and community research. Projects may include interviews, historical research, surveys, case studies, participant observation, media analysis, and writing op-eds. Students will have the opportunity to select from research projects developed by the community partners and instructors. Students that want to engage in an alternative project should consult with the instructors. Students are encouraged to enroll for multiple quarters to develop more substantial projects and deeper relationships with community partners.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 100B: Grassroots Community Organizing Field Work

Continuation of projects and community engagement from CSRE 100. Prerequisite: completion of CSRE 100.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Murray, D. (PI)

CSRE 103: Intergroup Communication (PSYCH 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication.nnThe objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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