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1 - 10 of 91 results for: CS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. The time listed on AXESS is for the first week's logistical meeting only. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 22A: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

CS 41: Hap.py Code: The Python Programming Language

The fundamentals and contemporary usage of the Python programming language. Primary focus on developing best practices in writing Python and exploring the extensible and unique parts of Python that make it such a powerful language. Topics include: data structures (e.g. lists and dictionaries) and characteristic pythonic conventions such as anonymous functions, iterables, and powerful built-ins (e.g. map, filter, zip). We will also cover object-oriented design, the standard library, and common third-party packages (e.g. requests, pillow). Time permitting, we will explore modern Python-based web frameworks and project distribution. Prerequisite: 106B/X or equivalent. Application required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 50: Using Tech for Good

Students in the class will work in small teams to implement high-impact projects for partner organizations. Taught by the CS+Social Good team, the aim of the class is to empower you to leverage technology for social good by inspiring action, facilitating collaboration, and forging pathways towards global change. Recommended: CS 106B, CS 42 or 142. Class is open to students of all years.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 52: CS + Social Good: Implementing Sustainable Social Impact Projects

Continuation of CS51 (Building Social Impact Projects for Change). Teams enter the quarter having completed and tested a minimal viable product (MVP) with a well-defined target user, and a community partner. Students will learn to apply scalable technical frameworks, methods to measure social impact, tools for deployment, user acquisition techniques and growth/exit strategies. The purpose of the class is to facilitate students to build a sustainable infrastructure around their product idea. CS52 will host mentors, guest speakers and industry experts for various workshops and coaching-sessions. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their projects with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 51, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 82: Social Impacts of Media Innovation

Media innovation merges technical and cultural development and benefits diverse social groups in different ways. Considering historic media innovations such as cinema, hip-hop, and the works of innovator in residence Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky, the course focuses on what ideas benefit whom. Lectures and workshops underscore the need to innovate to survive and get heard, and offer know-how for radical innovation in the arts and entertainment industry. Course projects will be considered for inclusion in the Stanford Humanities Showcase. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 101: Introduction to Computing Principles

Introduces the essential ideas of computing: data representation, algorithms, programming "code", computer hardware, networking, security, and social issues. Students learn how computers work and what they can do through hands-on exercises. In particular, students will see the capabilities and weaknesses of computer systems so they are not mysterious or intimidating. Course features many small programming exercises, although no prior programming experience is assumed or required. CS101 is not a complete programming course such as CS106A. CS101 is effectively an alternative to CS105. A laptop computer is recommended for the in-class exercises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Parlante, N. (PI)

CS 102: Big Data: Tools and Techniques, Discoveries and Pitfalls

Aimed primarily at students who may not major in CS but want to learn about big data and apply that knowledge in their areas of study. Many of the world's biggest discoveries and decisions in science, technology, business, medicine, politics, and society as a whole, are now being made on the basis of analyzing massive data sets, but it is surprisingly easy to come to false conclusions from data analysis alone, and privacy of data connected to individuals can be a major concern. This course provides a broad introduction to big data: historical context and case studies; privacy issues; data analysis techniques including databases, data mining, and machine learning; sampling and statistical significance; data analysis tools including spreadsheets, SQL, Python, R; data visualization techniques and tools. Tools and techniques are hands-on but at a cursory level, providing a basis for future exploration and application. Prerequisites: high school AP computer science, CS106A, or other equivalent programming experience; comfort with statistics and spreadsheets helpful but not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 103: Mathematical Foundations of Computing

Mathematical foundations required for computer science, including propositional predicate logic, induction, sets, functions, and relations. Formal language theory, including regular expressions, grammars, finite automata, Turing machines, and NP-completeness. Mathematical rigor, proof techniques, and applications. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 103A: Mathematical Problem-solving Strategies

Problem solving strategies and techniques in discrete mathematics and computer science. Additional problem solving practice for CS103. In-class participation required. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Co-requisite: CS103.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Schwarz, K. (PI)
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