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1 - 10 of 31 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 10N: Shakespeare and Performance in a Global Context

Preference to freshmen. The problem of performance including the performance of gender through the plays of Shakespeare. In-class performances by students of scenes from plays. The history of theatrical performance. Sources include filmed versions of plays, and readings on the history of gender, gender performance, and transvestite theater.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 27Q: You Are Here: Writing in the Age of Environmental Crisis

How have writers on a global scale responded to a growing sense of environmental crisis? How do various literary genres and forms help writers convey a sense of urgency, evoke feelings of loss, or prompt a call to action? Students will encounter recent stories, songs, memoirs, essays, and poems by writers from around the world that engage with the relationship between humans and our precarious environment. Texts such as Cormac McCarthy¿s post-apocalyptic novel The Road, Inger Christensen¿s long poem alphabet, and Arundati Roy¿s fable ¿The Briefing¿ will allow us to see how race, class, and region impact experiences and depictions of a planet in crisis. These texts will also model options for students¿ own creative writing on nature, place, and crisis across genres. Assignments will include observational writing, experiments with genre shifts, and research and writing on the places we call home as members of a global community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Tate, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 55N: Batman, Hamilton, Díaz, and Other Wondrous Lives

This seminar concerns the design and analysis of imaginary (or constructed) worlds for narratives and media such as films, comics, and literary texts. The seminar's primary goal is to help participants understand the creation of better imaginary worlds - ultimately all our efforts should serve that higher purpose. Some of the things we will consider when taking on the analysis of a new world include: What are its primary features - spatial, cultural, biological, fantastic, cosmological? What is the world's ethos (the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize the world)? What are the precise strategies that are used by the artist to convey the world to us and us to the world? How are our characters connected to the world? And how are we - the viewer or reader or player - connected to the world?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 102: Film Series: Understanding Turkey Through Film (COMPLIT 302)

Join us in our quest to understand the recent developments in Turkey and their impact on its people through cinematic production. Set against the backdrop of Turkey's cultural, political and social transformation in the last decade, the movies in this series tell the uneasy stories of individuals whose lives are affected by this disruptive change. By examining the link between individual troubles and public issues, the films confront issues such as globalization, gender and racial hierarchy, neo-liberal urban transformation, male domination, state oppression, and women's oppression in Turkey. Each screening will be followed by a discussion lead by invited scholars of Turkey or film directors. At each screening we will look closely at a film and discuss how the directors and script writers responded to larger scale cultural and social dynamics to present them as personal stories. Enrolled students must attend all five screenings and at least three talks of their choice at the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies annual conference Understanding Turkey: Vision, Revision, and the Future which will be held on April 28-29 2017. All screenings are free and open to the public. All attendees are encouraged to participate in the post-screening discussions. All films are in Turkish with English subtitles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Karahan, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 110: Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies (COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X, FEMGEN 310X)

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 123: The Novel, the Global South (DLCL 143, ENGLISH 184)

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Great Depression to the present. The seminar will focus on texts by William Faulkner, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Toni Morrison, and Junot Diaz.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 138A: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 138, JAPAN 238)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan's modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. Primary texts include: Futabatei Shimei's Floating Clouds, Higuchi Ichiyô's Child's Play, Natsume Sôseki's Kokoro, Kobayashi Takiji's Cannery Boat, Ôe Kenzaburô's The Catch, and Yoshimoto Banana's Kitchen. Examination of these literary works will be contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, and the social effects of the postwar economic expansion), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, and postmodernism of the 1980s). The goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, to the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Reichert, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 151B: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (COMPLIT 351B, TAPS 151T, TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 154A: Film & Philosophy (FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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