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1 - 10 of 26 results for: AA

AA 93: Building Trust in Autonomy

Preparatory course for Bing Overseas Studies summer course in Edinburgh. Prerequisite: Requires instructor consent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AA 109Q: Aerodynamics of Race Cars

Almost as soon as cars had been invented, races of various kinds were organized. In all its forms (open-wheel, touring car, sports car, production-car, one-make, stock car, etc.), car racing is today a very popular sport with a huge media coverage and significant commercial sponsorships. More importantly, it is a proving ground for new technologies and a battlefield for the giants of the automotive industry. While race car performance depends on elements such as engine power, chassis design, tire adhesion and of course, the driver, aerodynamics probably plays the most vital role in determining the performance and efficiency of a race car. Front and/or rear wings are visible on many of them. During this seminar, you will learn about many other critical components of a race car including diffusers and add-ons such as vortex generators and spoilers. You will also discover that due to the competitive nature of this sport and its associated short design cycles, engineering decisions about a more »
Almost as soon as cars had been invented, races of various kinds were organized. In all its forms (open-wheel, touring car, sports car, production-car, one-make, stock car, etc.), car racing is today a very popular sport with a huge media coverage and significant commercial sponsorships. More importantly, it is a proving ground for new technologies and a battlefield for the giants of the automotive industry. While race car performance depends on elements such as engine power, chassis design, tire adhesion and of course, the driver, aerodynamics probably plays the most vital role in determining the performance and efficiency of a race car. Front and/or rear wings are visible on many of them. During this seminar, you will learn about many other critical components of a race car including diffusers and add-ons such as vortex generators and spoilers. You will also discover that due to the competitive nature of this sport and its associated short design cycles, engineering decisions about a race car must rely on combined information from track, wind tunnel, and numerical computations. It is clear that airplanes fly on wings. However, when you have completed this seminar, you will be able to understand that cars fly on their tires. You will also be able to appreciate that aerodynamics is important not only for drag reduction, but also for increasing cornering speeds and lateral stability. You will be able to correlate between a race car shape and the aerodynamics effects intended for influencing performance. And if you have been a fan of the Ferrari 458 Italia, you will be able to figure out what that black moustache in the front of the car was for.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Farhat, C. (PI)

AA 122N: Dawn of the Drones: How Will Unmanned Aerial Systems Change Our World?

Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) have exploded on the scene in recent years, igniting a national debate about how to use them, how to regulate them, and how to make them safe. This seminar will dive into the many engineering challenges behind the headlines: in the future, how will we engineer UASs ranging in size from simple RC toys to highly-sophisticated autonomous scientific and military data gathering systems? This seminar will examine the key elements required to conceive, implement, deploy, and operate state-of-the-art of drone systems: What variety of problems can they help us solve? How autonomous are they and how autonomous do they need to be? What are the key technical bottlenecks preventing widespread deployment? How are they different from commercial aircraft? What kinds of companies will serve the market for UAV-related products and services? What business models will be successful and why? We will emphasize aspects of design, autonomy, reliability, navigation, sensing, and more »
Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) have exploded on the scene in recent years, igniting a national debate about how to use them, how to regulate them, and how to make them safe. This seminar will dive into the many engineering challenges behind the headlines: in the future, how will we engineer UASs ranging in size from simple RC toys to highly-sophisticated autonomous scientific and military data gathering systems? This seminar will examine the key elements required to conceive, implement, deploy, and operate state-of-the-art of drone systems: What variety of problems can they help us solve? How autonomous are they and how autonomous do they need to be? What are the key technical bottlenecks preventing widespread deployment? How are they different from commercial aircraft? What kinds of companies will serve the market for UAV-related products and services? What business models will be successful and why? We will emphasize aspects of design, autonomy, reliability, navigation, sensing, and perception, as well as coordination/collaboration through a series of case studies drawn from our recent experience. Examples include imaging efforts to map the changing coral reefs in the South Pacific, using and controlling swarms of unmanned systems to perform search and rescue missions over large areas, and package delivery systems over large metropolitan areas. Hands-on experience with Stanford-developed UASs will be part of the seminar.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Alonso, J. (PI)

AA 190: Directed Research and Writing in Aero/Astro

For undergraduates. Experimental or theoretical work under faculty direction, and emphasizing development of research and communication skills. Written report(s) and letter grade required; if this is not appropriate, enroll in 199. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics, involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of student services manager and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AA 199: Independent Study in Aero/Astro

Directed reading, lab, or theoretical work for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 203: Introduction to Optimal Control and Dynamic Optimization

Basic solution techniques for optimal control and dynamic optimization problems. Dynamic programming, calculus of variations, and numerical techniques for trajectory optimization. Special cases (chiefly LQR and robotic motion planning); modern solution approaches (such as MPC and MILP); and introduction to stochastic optimal control. Examples in MATLAB and CVX.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pavone, M. (PI)

AA 218: Introduction to Symmetry Analysis

Methods of symmetry analysis and their use in the reduction and simplification of physical problems. Topics: dimensional analysis, phase-space analysis of autonomous systems of ordinary differential equations, use of Lie groups to reduce the order of nonlinear ODEs and to generate integrating factors, use of Lie groups to reduce the dimension of partial differential equations and to generate similarity variables, exact solutions of nonlinear PDEs generated from groups. Mathematica-based software developed by the instructor is used for finding invariant groups of ODEs and PDEs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Cantwell, B. (PI)

AA 222: Engineering Design Optimization (CS 361)

Design of engineering systems within a formal optimization framework. This course covers the mathematical and algorithmic fundamentals of optimization, including derivative and derivative-free approaches for both linear and non-linear problems, with an emphasis on multidisciplinary design optimization. Topics will also include quantitative methodologies for addressing various challenges, such as accommodating multiple objectives, automating differentiation, handling uncertainty in evaluations, selecting design points for experimentation, and principled methods for optimization when evaluations are expensive. Applications range from the design of aircraft to automated vehicles. Prerequisites: some familiarity with probability, programming, and multivariable calculus.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 241X: Autonomous Aircraft: Design/Build/Fly

Students grouped according to their expertise to carry out the multidisciplinary design of a solar-powered autonomous aircraft that must meet a clearly stated set of design requirements. Design and construction of the airframe, integration with existing guidance, navigation, and control systems, and development and operation of the resulting design. Design reviews and reports. Prerequisites: expertise in any of the following disciplines by having satisfied the specified courses or equivalent work elsewhere: conceptual design (241A,B); applied aerodynamics (200A,B); structures (240A); composite manufacturing experience; guidance and control (208/271, ENGR 205).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kroo, I. (PI)
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