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1 - 10 of 60 results for: SOC ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SOC 2: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (PSYCH 70)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.nnnThis course is offered for 3-4 units. The 4 unit option has weekly discussion sections while the 3 unit version does not.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 111: State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Shin, G. (PI)

SOC 118: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 218)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Munoz, J. (PI)

SOC 129X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

SOC 135: Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States (SOC 235)

Over the last three decades, inequality in America has increased substantially. Why has this happened, and what can be done about it? The course will begin by surveying the basic features of poverty, inequality, and economic mobility in the 21st century. From here we will discuss issues related to discrimination, education and schools, criminal justice, and the changing nature of the family as forces that shape inequality. We will also focus on the main social policy options for addressing inequality in the United States, including income support for the poor, taxing higher incomes, efforts to encourage philanthropy, and other institutional reforms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Young, C. (PI)

SOC 142: Sociology of Gender

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the sociological conceptualization of gender. Through the sociological lens, gender is not an individual attribute or a role, but rather a system of social practices that constructs two different categories of people men and women and organizes social interaction and inequality around this difference. First we will explore what ¿gender¿ is according to sociologists and the current state of gender inequality in the labor market, at home, and at school. We will then investigate how gender structures our everyday lives through the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Finally, we will discuss avenues for reducing gender inequality. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research on gender."
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 149: The Urban Underclass (SOC 249, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 151: From the Cradle to the Grave: How Demographic Processes Shape the Social World (SOC 251)

(Graduate students register for 251 and 5 units. Undergraduates register for 151 and 4 units.) Comparative analysis of historical, contemporary, and anticipated demographic change. Draws on case studies from around the world to explore the relationship between social structure and population dynamics. Introduces demographic measures, concepts and theory. Course combines lecture and seminar-style discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 152: The Social Determinants of Health (SOC 252)

Our social and physical environments are widely recognized as playing a central role in shaping patterns of health and disease within and across populations. Across disciplines, a key question has been: How does the social environment ¿gets under the skin to influence health? In this course, we will explore how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians tackle this question. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine to understand the processes through which our environments shape health outcomes. We will examine a number of key social determinants of health, wellness and illness. These determinants include socioeconomic status, gender. race/ethnicity, religious affiliation, neighborhoods, environments, social relationships, and health care. We will also discuss a host of mechanisms through which these factors are hypothesized to influence health, such as stress, lifestyle, and access to health resources. An overall theme will be how contextual factors that adversely affect health are inequitably distributed and thereby fuel health disparities. Through all of this, we will assess the promise of public policy, planning and research for generating more equitable health outcomes across society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 154: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, COMM 254)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Christin, A. (PI)
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