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1 - 10 of 19 results for: GERMAN

GERMAN 88: Germany in 5 Words

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Daub, A. (PI)

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.nGerman Studies Assistant Professor Lea Pao will teach this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Landry, O. (PI)

GERMAN 120C: German in Public: Popular Music in Germany and Austria from 1945 to the Present

In this course, we will trace the history of German and Austrian popular music from the postwar period to the present day. Key questions which we will address include: What is popular music in Germany and Austria? How do changes in popular music reflect (and sometimes contribute to) changes in society and politics in Germany and Austria? What is it that is specifically `German¿ or `Austrian¿ about their respective varieties of popular music? Topics will include post-war Schlager music, the New German Wave, the Eurovision Song Contest, Viennese musicals, East German rock, and the growth of German hip hop. No musical experience necessary! A further central focus of the course is developing students¿ German language ability. In particular, we will work on improving skills of narration, description and comparison. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 132: Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath, divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.nDr. Colleen Anderson will teach this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 157: What kind of Information is Poetry (GERMAN 357)

"Only a fool reads poetry for facts": To read a poem with the same fact-seeking attention required by using a dictionary, reading a newspaper article, or following a recipe is, perhaps, foolish. But if it is, it is so only because it means the reader has not understood what a poem is supposed to do. Consider Wittgenstein's famous warning: "Do not forget that a poem, even though it is composed in the language of information, is not used in the language-game of giving information." A poem, even though it is made of the same (kinds of) words as information, ought not to be treated as information (the sentence seems to say). Distinct in their respective functions, poetry and information form two ends of an opposition: one for the creative possibilities for human expression, the other for the practical and mechanical tasks of everyday life.nBut what really "is" information? Has poetry not, since the beginning of time, also functioned as vehicle for storing, quantifying, and communicating th more »
"Only a fool reads poetry for facts": To read a poem with the same fact-seeking attention required by using a dictionary, reading a newspaper article, or following a recipe is, perhaps, foolish. But if it is, it is so only because it means the reader has not understood what a poem is supposed to do. Consider Wittgenstein's famous warning: "Do not forget that a poem, even though it is composed in the language of information, is not used in the language-game of giving information." A poem, even though it is made of the same (kinds of) words as information, ought not to be treated as information (the sentence seems to say). Distinct in their respective functions, poetry and information form two ends of an opposition: one for the creative possibilities for human expression, the other for the practical and mechanical tasks of everyday life.nBut what really "is" information? Has poetry not, since the beginning of time, also functioned as vehicle for storing, quantifying, and communicating things¿from historical events, the law, to agricultural manuals, just as "informational" texts do? How has the emergence of technological media in our so-called Information Age altered, reinforced, or revolutionized the place of poetry in the realm of human communication?nThese questions will motivate this course, which is also a general introduction to poetry and poetics. We will closely read German texts from the Musipilli to digital-born poetry, and secondary material from thinkers and theorists such as Schlegel, Schleiermacher, Benjamin, Wittgenstein, Flusser, and Bense, to learn how various methods of reading and literary criticism - from formalism and structuralism to Digital Humanities approaches - have developed alongside something like "information" as literary quality and social form.nAssistant Professor Lea Pao will teach this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 165: Afro-German Art Forms

The past few years has seen a growth in scholars investigating the complex identities and histories of Black/Afro-Germans. While other groups in the African Diaspora have one common story (i.e. slavery in the context of the Americas), the same cannot be said for Afro-Germans. Their stories are varied and cannot be explained with one narrative. nnThis course seeks to introduce students to varied Afro-German voices and experiences through literature, film, and theory. Students in this course can expect to:n- develop skills in literary, art and performance analysisn- weigh the historical, political, social, cultural and ideological aspects of race in Germanyn- think about the way Afro-Germans complicate German national identityn- recognize contributions of Afro-GermansnThis course will be taught in English, but German-speaking students are encouraged to read in the original.nDr. Jamele Watkins will teach this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature, with particular focus on the question of value: what, if anything, does engagement with literary works do for our lives? Issues include aesthetic self-fashioning, the paradox of tragedy, the paradox of caring, the truth-value of fiction, metaphor, authorship, irony, make-believe, expression, edification, clarification, and training. Readings are drawn from literature and film, philosophical theories of art, and stylistically interesting works of philosophy. Authors may include Sophocles, Chaucer, Dickinson, Proust, Woolf, Borges, Beckett, Kundera, Charlie Kaufman; Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas; Plato, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 191: German Capstone Project

Each student participates in a capstone interview and discussion with a panel of the German Studies faculty on topics related to German cultural and literary analysis. In prepration for the interview/discussion, students submit written answers to a set of questions based on several authentic cultural texts in German. The written answers, normally in English, should be well-formed and coherent. Within the interview/discussion, students must demonstrate a further understanding of the topic(s) posed, through cogent argument.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 222: Myth and Modernity (COMPLIT 222A, GERMAN 322)

Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)
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