2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 23 results for: COMPLIT

COMPLIT 10N: Shakespeare and Performance in a Global Context

Preference to freshmen. The problem of performance including the performance of gender through the plays of Shakespeare. In-class performances by students of scenes from plays. The history of theatrical performance. Sources include filmed versions of plays, and readings on the history of gender, gender performance, and transvestite theater. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 102: Film Series: Understanding Turkey Through Film (COMPLIT 302)

Join us in our quest to understand the recent developments in Turkey and their impact on its people through cinematic production. Set against the backdrop of Turkey's cultural, political and social transformation in the last decade, the movies in this series tell the uneasy stories of individuals whose lives are affected by this disruptive change. By examining the link between individual troubles and public issues, the films confront issues such as globalization, gender and racial hierarchy, neo-liberal urban transformation, male domination, state oppression, and women's oppression in Turkey. Each screening will be followed by a discussion lead by invited scholars of Turkey or film directors. At each screening we will look closely at a film and discuss how the directors and script writers responded to larger scale cultural and social dynamics to present them as personal stories. Enrolled students must attend all five screenings and at least three talks of their choice at the Abbasi Pro more »
Join us in our quest to understand the recent developments in Turkey and their impact on its people through cinematic production. Set against the backdrop of Turkey's cultural, political and social transformation in the last decade, the movies in this series tell the uneasy stories of individuals whose lives are affected by this disruptive change. By examining the link between individual troubles and public issues, the films confront issues such as globalization, gender and racial hierarchy, neo-liberal urban transformation, male domination, state oppression, and women's oppression in Turkey. Each screening will be followed by a discussion lead by invited scholars of Turkey or film directors. At each screening we will look closely at a film and discuss how the directors and script writers responded to larger scale cultural and social dynamics to present them as personal stories. Enrolled students must attend all five screenings and at least three talks of their choice at the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies annual conference Understanding Turkey: Vision, Revision, and the Future which will be held on April 28-29, 2018. All screenings are free and open to the public. All attendees are encouraged to participate in the post-screening discussions. All films are in Turkish with English subtitles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Karahan, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 108: Contemporary Hebrew and English Poetry in Translation

A workshop in literary translation, focusing on Hebrew and English poetry and/or short prose. Together the class will engage in creating a bilingual anthology of contemporary works and discussing problems of literary translation such as preserving ambiguities, translating cultural context, literary conventions and poetic forms. Special focus on issues related to understanding and transferring the concept of "The Contemporary" between cultures. With guest translators. Advanced knowledge of Hebrew and English is required. Readings include: (Hebrew) Avot Yeshurun, Natan Zach, David Avidan, Haim Gouri, Sigal Ben-Yair, Almog Behar, Aharon Shabtai; (English) Marilyn Hacker, Annie Finch, Charles Bernstein, Ann Carson, Derek Walcott, David Whyte, Lyn Hejinian, Billy Collins,Mary Oliver, Kay Ryan. NOTE: Taught in Hebrew and English. At least some knowledge of Hebrew required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 110: Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies (COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X, FEMGEN 310X)

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 123: The Novel and the World (DLCL 143)

The Novel, the Global South Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Great Depression to the present. The seminar will focus on texts by William Faulkner, Gabriel García Márquez, Toni Morrison, and Junot Díaz.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 149: The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures (CSRE 149, ILAC 149)

Focus is given to emergent theories of culture and on comparative literary and cultural studies. How do we treat culture as a social force? How do we go about reading the presence of social contexts within cultural texts? How do ethno-racial writers re-imagine the nation as a site with many "cognitive maps" in which the nation-state is not congruent with cultural identity? How do diaspora and border narratives/texts strive for comparative theoretical scope while remaining rooted in specific local histories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 194: Independent Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 222A: Myth and Modernity (GERMAN 222, GERMAN 322)

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take GERMAN 222 or COMPLIT 222A for a minimum of 3 Units and a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints