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1 - 10 of 111 results for: CEE

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major. Contact hildemann@stanford.edu to request enrollment/permission code.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 6: Physics of Cities

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32F: Light, Color, and Space

This course explores color and light as a medium for spatial perception. Through the introduction of color theory, color mixing, and light analyses, students will learn to see and use light and color fields as a way to shape experience. We will examine the work of a range of architects and artist who use light and color to expand the field of perception (i.e. Rothko, Turrell, Eliasson, Holl, Aalto).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 32H: Responsive Structures (CEE 132H)

This Design Build seminar investigates the use of metal as a structural, spatial and organizational medium. We will examine the physical properties of post-formable plywood, and develop a structural system and design which respond to site and programmatic conditions. The process includes model building, prototyping, development of joinery, and culminates in the full scale installation of the developed design on campus. This course may be repeated for credit (up to three times). Class meeting days/times are as follows:nApril 14, 9a-5p; April 28, 10a-5p; May 3, 7-9p; May 19, 10a-6:30p; May 20, 10a-6:30p.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 32R: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32V: Architectural Design Lecture Series Course

This seminar is a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend the lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The four course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates TBD. The meeting times are 4:30 PM -5:30 PM for the seminar and 6:30 - 7:45 for the lecture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 70Q: The Food, Water, and Waste Nexus

This course will explore the connections between water access, fecal waste management, and food safety and provision in low- and middle-income countries. The interconnections between food, water, and waste will be discussed as it relates to human health and well-being. Topics that will be covered in the course include 1) farm to fork contamination pathways of food 2) food hygiene practices and barriers to implementation 3) waste water reuse practices 4) management of water for multiple uses 5) potential impact climate change may have on the connections of these systems. The students in the course will undertake individual research that explores the connections between these systems and identifies potential strategies to improve human health and well-being.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storag more »
Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 112A: Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction

Building upon the concept of VDC Scorecard, CEE 112A/212A investigates in the management of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) programs and projects in the building industry. Interacting with experts and professionals in real estate, architecture, engineering, construction and technology providers, students will learn from the industry applications of Building Information Modeling and its relationship with Integrated Project Delivery, Sustainable Design and Construction. Students will conduct case studies to evaluate the maturity of VDC planning, adoption, technology and performance in practice. Students taking 3 or 4 units will be paired up with independent research or case study projects on the industry applications of VDC. No prerequisite. See CEE112B/212B in the Winter Quarter and CEE 112C/212C in the Spring Quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kam, C. (PI)
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