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1 - 10 of 113 results for: CEE

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major. Contact hildemann@stanford.edu to request enrollment/permission code.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 6: Physics of Cities

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 7: Hacking for Urban Resilience: Expecting the Unexpected with a Lean Launchpad Mindset (CEE 707)

People, businesses and the built environment constituting major urban centers are fragile by their very nature. Aging infrastructure built on land subject to earthquake, flood and drought risks, neighborhood housing inequality, quality food, water, air, transportation and energy allocated based on ability to pay, jobs restructured by the global economy, and local political forces, cyber risks and data malfeasance creeping into digital lifestyles and urban systems. The cascading risks of failure from urban fragility play out in multiple scenarios, endangering local and regional economic, environmental and social systems. In the heat of urban emergency, rapid problem definition, innovative solution design and prototyping are unleashed and take control of the situational dynamics. nnLean startup methodologies that have successfully driven Silicon Valley¿s pace of innovation can improve governments¿ ability to respond to the same dynamics.nnIn this class student teams will take actual urba more »
People, businesses and the built environment constituting major urban centers are fragile by their very nature. Aging infrastructure built on land subject to earthquake, flood and drought risks, neighborhood housing inequality, quality food, water, air, transportation and energy allocated based on ability to pay, jobs restructured by the global economy, and local political forces, cyber risks and data malfeasance creeping into digital lifestyles and urban systems. The cascading risks of failure from urban fragility play out in multiple scenarios, endangering local and regional economic, environmental and social systems. In the heat of urban emergency, rapid problem definition, innovative solution design and prototyping are unleashed and take control of the situational dynamics. nnLean startup methodologies that have successfully driven Silicon Valley¿s pace of innovation can improve governments¿ ability to respond to the same dynamics.nnIn this class student teams will take actual urban resilience problems working with governmental organizations will apply ¿lean startup¿ principles to discover and validate beneficiary needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to validate the original the problem and build solution pathways. Teams take a hands-on approach, and are mentored by close engagement with actual Chief Resilience Officers, emergency responders, business and utility continuity executives, national and international response agencies, technology companies and nonprofits. Team applications required by [_______]. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32F: Light, Color, and Space

This course explores color and light as a medium for spatial perception. Through the introduction of color theory, color mixing, and light analyses, students will learn to see and use light and color fields as a way to shape experience. We will examine the work of a range of architects and artist who use light and color to expand the field of perception (i.e. Rothko, Turrell, Eliasson, Holl, Aalto).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 32H: Responsive Structures (CEE 132H)

This Design Build seminar investigates the use of metal as a structural, spatial and organizational medium. We will examine the physical properties of post-formable plywood, and develop a structural system and design which respond to site and programmatic conditions. The process includes model building, prototyping, development of joinery, and culminates in the full scale installation of the developed design on campus. This course may be repeated for credit (up to three times). Class meeting days/times are as follows:nApril 14, 9a-5p; April 28, 10a-5p; May 3, 7-9p; May 19, 10a-6:30p; May 20, 10a-6:30p.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 32R: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32V: Architectural Design Lecture Series Course

This seminar is a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend the lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The four course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates TBD. The meeting times are 4:30 PM -5:30 PM for the seminar and 6:30 - 7:45 for the lecture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 70Q: The Food, Water, and Waste Nexus

This course will explore the connections between water access, fecal waste management, and food safety and provision in low- and middle-income countries. The interconnections between food, water, and waste will be discussed as it relates to human health and well-being. Topics that will be covered in the course include 1) farm to fork contamination pathways of food 2) food hygiene practices and barriers to implementation 3) waste water reuse practices 4) management of water for multiple uses 5) potential impact climate change may have on the connections of these systems. The students in the course will undertake individual research that explores the connections between these systems and identifies potential strategies to improve human health and well-being.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storag more »
Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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