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1 - 10 of 25 results for: AMSTUD

AMSTUD 51S: American Travel, Tourism and Empire in the Pacific, 1880s-1970s (CSRE 51S, HISTORY 51S)

What does it mean to be a traveler or a tourist? Is travel a form of empire or exploitation? Can it ever be an innocent form of economic and cultural exchange? This class will examine how cultures of travel and tourism helped everyday Americans understand and shape the country's political, social, and economic challenges from the 1880s to 1970s, as the U.S. evolved from a continental empire, into an overseas empire, and finally into an informal empire.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 91: Exploring American Religious History (CSRE 91, HISTORY 260K, RELIGST 91)

This course will trace how contemporary beliefs and practices connect to historical trends in the American religious landscape.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lum, K. (PI)

AMSTUD 96: Signal to Noise: The Sounds of American Culture

Inundated by images and associated with the meteoric rise of such media as film and photography, the past century has long been considered a predominantly visual era. Yet, sound offers alternative sensory platforms for understanding American culture and history. ¿Sound history,¿ as Jonathan Sterne writes, ¿indexes changes in human nature and the human body ¿ in life and in death.¿ Similarly, transformations in American landscapes, from its cities to its national parks, can be heard as well as seen. In this course, we will explore the intertwined histories of sound, society, and space, asking how developments in auditory media have engaged with broader American culture. Through a study of history, film, literature, music, and other media, we will look at the relationship between sound and cultural change, as well as evolving attitudes towards diverse human bodies and identities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 101: Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film (CSRE 41)

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mesa, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 107: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (CSRE 108, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jarvis, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 110D: War and Peace in American Foreign Policy (INTNLREL 110D, POLISCI 110D, POLISCI 110Y)

(Students not taking this course for WIM, register for 110Y.) The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Schultz, K. (PI)

AMSTUD 124A: The American West (ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 137: The Dialogue of Democracy (COMM 137W, COMM 237, POLISCI 232T, POLISCI 332T)

All forms of democracy require some kind of communication so people can be aware of issues and make decisions. This course looks at competing visions of what democracy should be and different notions of the role of dialogue in a democracy. Is it just campaigning or does it include deliberation? Small scale discussions or sound bites on television? Or social media? What is the role of technology in changing our democratic practices, to mobilize, to persuade, to solve public problems? This course will include readings from political theory about democratic ideals - from the American founders to J.S. Mill and the Progressives to Joseph Schumpeter and modern writers skeptical of the public will. It will also include contemporary examinations of the media and the internet to see how those practices are changing and how the ideals can or cannot be realized.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fishkin, J. (PI)

AMSTUD 143A: American Architecture (ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

AMSTUD 145D: Jewish American Literature (ENGLISH 145D, JEWISHST 155D, REES 145D)

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of ¿Jewishness¿ itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of ¿Jewishness¿ differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We¿ll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents¿ nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these tran more »
From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of ¿Jewishness¿ itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of ¿Jewishness¿ differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We¿ll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents¿ nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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