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1 - 10 of 20 results for: AFRICAAM ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AFRICAAM 3E: Michelle Obama in American Culture (AMSTUD 3E, CSRE 3E, FEMGEN 3E, HISTORY 3E)

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

AFRICAAM 18B: Jazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present (MUSIC 18B)

Modern jazz styles from Bebop to the current scene. Emphasis is on the significant artists of each style.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Low, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 29: Roots Modern Experience II (DANCE 129)

In this course we will deepen our focus on many African and African diaspora movement traditions and their influences on Western contemporary dance with an emphasis on dance traditions of Cuba, Brazil, and Haiti. Our study of these dance disciplines will inform the movement vocabulary, technical training, class discussions, and choreography we experience in this course. Students will learn more about the dances and rhythms for the Orishas of Brazil and Cuba, and the Loa of Haiti with an additional focus on other African diaspora dance forms such as, house dance, salsa, Cuban Haitian, Palo, Samba and Samba-Reggae. Through our warm ups and class choreography, we will deepen our analysis of how African diaspora movement traditions are inherently embedded in many expressions of the broadly termed form known as contemporary dance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improv StratLab: Visual Performance in Art Spaces and Museums (DANCE 45)

This class will explore art/artists on the fringe of of the visual arts, projecting their work through performance. Class will consist of visiting artists, short readings, field trips, and a culminating performance to take place in the Anderson Collection. Through the exploration of these cross-disciplinary projects, students will gain a better understanding of the history of performance art, specifically in visual arts spaces; meet practicing artists; visit galleries, museums, and alternative art spaces in the Bay Area; and explore the artistic strategies used in performance or body based disciplines in order to create new, innovative or transformative ways of being and doing. Embodied thinking and improvisation is the primary methodology through which creative strategies, processes and practices are applied in both art and non-art contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 81: Media Representations of Africa (AFRICAST 81, AFRICAST 181)

How has Africa been dominantly represented in the media? How are these representations challenged, complexified and reproduced in the postcolonial context? What is the role of African media in these processes? This class is an introduction to the variety of roles played by the media in representing Africa, with a particular focus on the postcolonial context. The topic is particularly relevant to contemporary Africa as the emerging middle-class, economic and cultural globalization, and the uptake for communication technologies are shaping contested images of the continent. You will: develop a theoretical and empirical understanding of the media as instruments of domination but also of resistance; learn how to critically deconstruct media representations in everyday life; understand the challenges of intercultural communication in an unequal world. Key concepts such as: representation, stereotyping, cultural appropriation, afropessimism, afrocentrism, afro optimism, afropolitanism. Readings drawn from media and cultural studies, anthropology, postcolonial theory and literature. In class-analysis of photographs, news articles and broadcasts, PR campaigns, social media, films and documentaries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nothias, T. (PI)

AFRICAAM 102: Introduction to Public History and Public Service (CSRE 201, HISTORY 201)

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases careers in public history with guest speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 112: Urban Education (CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 120F: Buying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA (ANTHRO 120F, CSRE 120F)

This seminar examines how communities of color have critiqued and transformed capitalism in America through concepts of economic independence, entrepreneurship, and sovereignty. By tracing concepts such as the double-duty dollar, casino/tribal capitalisms, retail boycotts, and buying black, the course traces ethnic entrepreneurialism in America. Students will also consider the international context of such US-based movements, particularly in relation to American imperialism and global supply-chain capitalism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lu, V. (PI)

AFRICAAM 139: Black Feminist Epistemology and Analytics (FEMGEN 154E)

Building from the foundational canon of black feminist theory and praxis, this seminar will explore more recent advances in black feminist epistemologies and modes of analysis. Students will engage black feminist conceptions of the human and the self; love and relationality in precarious conditions; speculative queer, sexual, and body politics; aesthetics and cultural theory; and contemporary proposals for radical freedom and social transformation. We will consider how black feminist theory not only engages, builds on, critiques, and transforms other schools of thought, but also produces its own systems of reason and interpretation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bierria, A. (PI)
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