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1 - 10 of 133 results for: CEE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 29N: Managing Natural Disaster Risk

Natural disasters arise from the interaction of natural processes, such as earthquakes or floods, with human development that suffers safety-related and economic losses. We cannot predict exactly when those disasters will occur, or prevent them entirely, but we have a number of engineering and policy options that can reduce the impacts of such events.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Baker, J. (PI)

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 32G: Architecture Since 1900 (ARTHIST 142)

Art 142 is an introduction to the history of architecture since 1900 and how it has shaped and been shaped by its cultural contexts. The class also investigates the essential relationship between built form and theory during this period.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 32H: Responsive Structures (CEE 132H)

This Design Build seminar investigates the use of metal as a structural, spatial and organizational medium. We will examine the physical properties of post-formable plywood, and develop a structural system and design which respond to site and programmatic conditions. The process includes model building, prototyping, development of joinery, and culminates in the full scale installation of the developed design on campus. This course may be repeated for credit (up to three times).
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 32W: Making Meaning: A Purposeful Life in Design

As designers, how do we lead a life with meaning? What is a fuulfilling life in design and how do we develop personal and professional practices that support this aim? This experiential course will explore how to nourish a purposeful life amidst a culture that can value productivity over presence in the field, identifying "busyness" as a marker of personal worth. How do we bring depth to not only the design process but our individual and collective lives as well? Investigations will include: exploring personal passions, discovering meaningful work in design, understanding work/life/play balance, practicing self-reflection, integrating wellness, cultivating community, and practicing design with integrity. Our time in class will be enjoyed sharing meals, discourse, play, and reflections with both the class cohort and designers that lead lives or purpose and meaning.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 32X: Modern and Contemporary World Architecture: A Cultural History in Twenty Five Buildings (ARTHIST 141)

This survey course is a guided tour of twenty five case studies from the last hundred years; interrogates how architecture responds to the aesthetic, technological, political, and cultural issues of the societies they belong to, all over the world.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 32Y: Architecture & Gender (ARTHIST 248A)

This advanced seminar introduces students to the seemingly inconspicuous relation between architecture and gender. The course studies how modern societies create easily, controlled docile spaces, thus pursuing the absent bodies of its members - be it through symbolic or material means. This troubled history of the powers of architecture to neglect sexuality and impose strict gender roles is analyzed in class discussions through recent feminist and queer theoretical approaches and tested on case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 32Z: The Intersection of Performance, Architecture & Design (DANCE 22)

In this class we will create a performance installation utilizing our expressive talents, but also accessing the ways that we are dancing and singing through life. Drawing from the everyday and extra daily movements, we will create a `sneaker ballet¿ to integrate our everyday experiences into our wild imaginings. Students will participate in a Chocolate Heads collaborative making process which will include observing peripatetic crowds, , sharing our individual and collective expressive expertise in movement, music and art while also integrating and learning art forms and ways of thinking from other members of the class. Working in art spaces and galleries, students will gain awareness of spatial relationships and site navigation from the vantage point of architecture, theater, and dance. Though field trips, guest artists and lecturers, and collaborative sharing, teaching and learning, students will create a performance event for an art gallery space that will foster community, unique expressivity, cultural understanding and fun. Designed for all levels. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

CEE 33A: Michelangelo Architect (ARTHIST 216A, ARTHIST 416A, ITALIAN 216)

The architecture of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), "Father and Master of all the Arts," redefined the possibilities of architectural expression for generations. This course considers his civic, ecclesiastic, and palatial works. It proceeds from his beginnings in Medicean Florence to his fulfillment in Papal Rome. It examines the anxiety of influence following his death and his enduring legacy in modernism. Topics include: Michelangelo's debt to Classical and Early Renaissance prototypes; his transformation of the canon; the iterative sketch as disegno; architecture and the body; the queering of architectural language; sketch, scale, and materiality; Modernism and Michelangelo. The historiography of Michelangelo has predominantly favored studies in painting and sculpture. Our focus on architecture encourages students to test new ideas and alternative approaches to his work.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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