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1 - 10 of 115 results for: CEE

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major. Contact hildemann@stanford.edu to request enrollment/permission code.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 1A: Graphics Course

This course, intended for students taking a design studio, will focus on presentation theories, skills and design approaches. Through readings and exercises, and ultimately the student's own work, students will develop skill and complexity in their graphic and verbal presentations
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 29N: Managing Natural Disaster Risk

Natural disasters arise from the interaction of natural processes, such as earthquakes or floods, with human development that suffers safety-related and economic losses. We cannot predict exactly when those disasters will occur, or prevent them entirely, but we have a number of engineering and policy options that can reduce the impacts of such events.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Baker, J. (PI)

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 32B: Design Theory

This seminar focuses on the key themes, histories, and methods of architectural theory -- a form of architectural practice that establishes the aims and philosophies of architecture. Architectural theory is primarily written, but it also incorporates drawing, photography, film, and other media. nnOne of the distinctive features of modern and contemporary architecture is its pronounced use of theory to articulate its aims. One might argue that modern architecture is modern because of its incorporation of theory. This course focuses on those early-modern, modern, and late-modern writings that have been and remain entangled with contemporary architectural thought and design practice. nnRather than examine the development of modern architectural theory chronologically, it is explored architectural through thematic topics. These themes enable the student to understand how certain architectural theoretical concepts endure, are transformed, and can be furthered through his/her own explorations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 32Q: Place: Making Space Now

This seminar argues that architeccts are ultimately "placemakers," and questions what that means in the contemporary world. Part I investigates the meaning of the word "place." Additional background for understanding contemporary place making will include a critique of the history of modern place-making through an examination of modern form. Part II examines two traditional notions of place by scale: from "home" to "the city." What elements give these conceptions of space a sense of place? To answer this question, themes such as memory, mapping, and boundary, among others, will be investigated. part III presents challenges to the traditional notions of place discussed in Part II. Topics addressed include: What does it mean to be "out of place"? What sense of place does a nomad have, and how is this represented? What are the "non-places" and how can architects design for these spaces? Part IV addresses the need to re-conceptualize contemporary space. The role of digital and cyber technologies, the construction of locality in a global world, and the in-between places that result from a world in flux are topics discussed in this section of the seminar. nLearning goals: Specific goals include clsoe reading of texts, understanding of philosophical thinking and writing, argument under uncertainty, and developed concepts of place, space and architecture.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 101A: Mechanics of Materials

Introduction to beam and column theory. Normal stress and strain in beams under various loading conditions; shear stress and shear flow; deflections of determinate and indeterminate beams; analysis of column buckling; structural loads in design; strength and serviceability criteria. Lab experiments. Prerequisites: ENGR 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Linder, C. (PI)

CEE 112A: Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction

Building upon the concept of VDC Scorecard, CEE 112A/212A investigates in the management of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) programs and projects in the building industry. Interacting with experts and professionals in real estate, architecture, engineering, construction and technology providers, students will learn from the industry applications of Building Information Modeling and its relationship with Integrated Project Delivery, Sustainable Design and Construction. Students will conduct case studies to evaluate the maturity of VDC planning, adoption, technology and performance in practice. Students taking 3 or 4 units will be paired up with independent research or case study projects on the industry applications of VDC. No prerequisite. See CEE112B/212B in the Winter Quarter and CEE 112C/212C in the Spring Quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kam, C. (PI)

CEE 130: Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process

Preference to Architectural Design majors; others by consent of instructor. Projects investigate conceptual approaches to the design of key architectural elements, such as wall and roof. Functional and structural considerations. Focus is on constructing 3-D models in a range of materials; 3-D computer modeling. Students keep a graphic account of the evolution of their design process. Final project entails design of a simple structure. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite: CEE 31 or 31Q.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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