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51 - 60 of 116 results for: CEE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 235: CapaCity Design Studio

Silicon Valley's rapid expansion has created explosive urban development in a fragile and under-prepared natural context. Delicate coastal ecology and rapid urbanization (expanding technology headquarters, new residential housing, parking, services, etc.) are competing for space. The same land also serves the regional functions of transport, open space, recreation, water supply, flood protection and wastewater treatment. Compounding the problems between these competing factors are global climate change instabilities increasing the certainty of catastrophic flooding, infrastructure collapse, and other urban resilience challenges. Students will be immersed in a process that allows them to understand and spatially identify these risks, develop a vocabulary and understanding of innovative tools to respond to them, and then work with expert practitioners to create unique design responses. Students will be provided with urban design frameworks (for planning, site development, and conservatio more »
Silicon Valley's rapid expansion has created explosive urban development in a fragile and under-prepared natural context. Delicate coastal ecology and rapid urbanization (expanding technology headquarters, new residential housing, parking, services, etc.) are competing for space. The same land also serves the regional functions of transport, open space, recreation, water supply, flood protection and wastewater treatment. Compounding the problems between these competing factors are global climate change instabilities increasing the certainty of catastrophic flooding, infrastructure collapse, and other urban resilience challenges. Students will be immersed in a process that allows them to understand and spatially identify these risks, develop a vocabulary and understanding of innovative tools to respond to them, and then work with expert practitioners to create unique design responses. Students will be provided with urban design frameworks (for planning, site development, and conservation) combined with advanced sustainable design concepts (such as resource co-optimization, and adaptable infrastructure platforms, and high performance urban ecology) by working with expert lecturers and in small groups. Students will ultimately develop a series of visual and technical presentations to propose a final thesis for a local intervention that could be replicated in other coastal contexts globally. This course has been designed to develop student learning through a project-based format. Students will be organized into design teams of 3 or 4 and will have the semester to collaborate with partners on an interdisciplinary proposal including policy and design recommendations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Varga, L. (PI)

CEE 241: Managing Fabrication and Construction

Methods to manage the physical production of construction projects; design, analysis, and optimization of the fabricate-assemble process including performance metrics. Project management techniques and production system design including: push versus pull methods; master scheduling and look-ahead scheduling; scope, cost, and schedule control; earned value analysis; critical path method; location-based scheduling; 4D modeling; workflow; trade coordination; methods to understand uncertainty and reduce process variability; and supply chain systems including made-to-stock, engineered-to-order, and made-to-order. Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Recommended corequisite: 240.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 241B: Infrastructure Project Delivery (CEE 141B)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities ,and communications sectors. Analysis of how projects are designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. Focus is on public works projects in the U.S. Alternative project delivery approaches and organizational strategies. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare finance/design/build/operate/maintain project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 242: Organization Design for Projects and Companies

Introduction to organizational behavior and organizational design for construction projects and companies. Class incorporates readings, individual, small group and large group case study assignments. Students use computer simulation to design real-world project organizations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 249: Labor and Industrial Relations: Negotiations, Strikes, and Dispute Resolution

Labor/management negotiations, content of a labor agreement, strikes, dispute resolution, contemporary issues affecting labor and management, and union versus open shop competitiveness in the marketplace. Case studies; presentations by union leaders, legal experts, and contractor principals. Simulated negotiation session with union officials and role play in an arbitration hearing.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Walton, M. (PI)

CEE 255: Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE (CEE 155)

Introduce the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring the built and natural environment. Emphasis on the integration of modern sensor and communication technologies, signal processing and statistical models for network data analysis and interpretation to create practical deployments to enable sustainable systems, in areas such as energy, weather, transportation and buildings. Students will be involved in a practical project that may involve deploying a small sensor system, data models and analysis and signal processing. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 256: Building Systems (CEE 156)

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kolderup, E. (PI)

CEE 259: Managing Construction Innovation - Practicum (CEE 159)

CEE 159/259 students join Stanford researchers in developing metrics and key performance indicators, which inform the assessment and management of productivity policies, industry initiatives, progressive enterprises, global projects or experimental processes in the construction industry. This practicum builds upon a global network of government agencies, professional institutions and member companies collaborating with the Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (CIFE). Students will develop applied research skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice, while gaining insights into innovative and industrialized construction practice, such as the industry applications of Building Information Modeling (BIM), Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), Lean Methodology, Prefabricated Pre-finished Volumetric Construction (PPVC), Smart Cities or Virtual Design and Construction (VDC).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kam, C. (PI)

CEE 259B: Construction Problems

Group-selected problems in construction techniques, equipment, or management; preparation of oral and written reports. Guest specialists from the construction industry. See 299 for individual studies. Prerequisites: graduate standing in CEM program and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 260C: Contaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport (ESS 221)

Decades of industrial activity have released vast quantities of contaminants to groundwater, threatening water resources, ecosystems and human health. What processes control the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface? What remediation strategies are effective and what are the tradeoffs among them? How are these processes represented in models used for regulatory and decision-making purposes? This course will address these and related issues by focusing on the conceptual and quantitative treatment of advective-dispersive transport with reacting solutes, including modern methods of contaminant transport simulation. Some Matlab programming / program modification required. Prerequisite: Physical Hydrogeology ESS 220 / CEE 260A (Gorelick) or equivalent and college-level course work in chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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