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1 - 10 of 49 results for: PSYCH

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 80: Introduction to Personality and Affective Science

How do we measure personality and emotion? What parts of your personality and emotions are set at birth? What parts of your personality and emotions are shaped by your sociocultural context? Can your personality and emotions make you sick? Can you change your personality and emotions? These are questions we begin to address in this introductory course on personality and emotion. Prerequisite: Psych 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Tsai, J. (PI)

PSYCH 95: Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

Theories of and approaches to understanding the phenomenology, etiology, and treatment of psychological disorders among adults and children. Research findings and diagnostic issues. Recommended: PSYCH 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 103: Intergroup Communication (CSRE 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication.nnThe objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (CSRE 103F)

This is a TA training course for Psych 103 - Intergroup Communication
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 121: Ion Transport and Intracellular Messengers (PSYCH 228)

(Graduate students register for 228.) Ion channels, carriers, ion pumps, and their regulation by intracellular messengers in a variety of cell types. Recommended: 120, introductory course in biology or human biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wine, J. (PI)

PSYCH 132: Language and Thought

Languages vary tremendously in how they allow us to express ourselves. In some languages, you have to say when an event happened (past, present, future, etc.), while in others it is obligatory to say how you know about the event (you saw it, you heard about it), or what genders its participants were. In addition, languages just feel different from one another - some feel poetic while others feel brutal. Some things just don't sound right in certain languages, and some translations are harder than others to pull off. But are these differences meaningful? Do differences across languages cause substantive changes in the cognition of their speakers? We'll read some of the burgeoning research literature on these questions and consider how they can be answered with new empirical tools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 135: The Psychology of Diverse Community (CSRE 135P)

This course is an exploration. Its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and mange such communities e.g. schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Steele, C. (PI)

PSYCH 146: Observation of Children

Learning about children through guided observations at Bing Nursery School, Psychology's lab for research and training in child development. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development. Recommended: 60.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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