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1 - 10 of 34 results for: ARTHIST ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARTHIST 36: DANGEROUS IDEAS (EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, RELIGST 21X)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and evil have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like religious tolerance, voting rights, and wilderness preservation play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Anderson, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 143A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 343A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 147: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 347)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 151: Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present (AMSTUD 151, ARTHIST 351, CSRE 151D)

This lecture course explores American art through the lens of immigration, exile, and diaspora. We will examine a wide range of work by immigrant artists and craftsmen, paying special attention to issues of race and ethnicity, assimilation, displacement, and political turmoil. Artists considered include Emmanuel Leutze, Thomas Cole, Joseph Stella, Chiura Obata, Willem de Kooning, Mona Hatoum, and Julie Mehretu, among many others. How do works of art reflect and help shape cultural and individual imaginaries of home and belonging?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 152: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 160: Intro to Contemporary Art

Introduction to major themes, figures, movements and ideas in contemporary art, beginning with the question of art and politics in the 1960s. Topics: Postmodernism and the rise of consumer and spectacle culture; the "death" of painting, the impact of technology, cybernetics and the rise of new media; art at the end of the Cold War; globalization and the new global art world. An intro art history course is recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 206C: Nostos: The Survival of Antiquity in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 406C)

This seminar explores the processes of survival and activation of Greco-Roman art in the Middle Ages, including iconographic transformations, modalities of reuse, trajectories of return (nostos), and the poetics of embodiment. Focusing on specific case studies from Italy, Spain, France, and England, this course offers in-depth analyses of some of the most remarkable artworks of the Middle Ages in different media, paying special attention to sculpture. Reading assignments will give students the background to engage critically with the thought of scholars such as A. Warburg, E. Panofsky, S. Freud, W. Benjamin, G. Agamben, M. Schapiro, P. Nora, L. Steinberg, and others, with the aim of gaining a rich theoretical perspective on Nachleben der Antike (Afterlife of Antiquity) ¿ one of the central themes in the history of art from Vasari to the most recent Warburgian revival.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 207B: Art and Ritual in Italy 1250-1420 (ARTHIST 407B)

This seminar explores the ritual contexts of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of late medieval Italy. Rituals structured almost every aspect of life in Italian towns. Elaborately choreographed rites of passage marked the great events of the life cycle, from pregnancy and childbirth to marriage to death. Each town¿s ritual calendar established the rhythms of the year. Major feast days were celebrated with all the pageantry of the late medieval Church. Crises ¿ whether famine or plague or the threat of war ¿ spawned their own ritual responses, often penitential processions of flagellants. The course considers the ways in which works of art register, respond to and participate in these rites. The last part of the course will focus on one of the most important and distinctive ritual spaces in late medieval Italy, the baptistery. Works to be studied include some by the greatest painters and sculptors of the era: the painters Duccio, Giotto, Simone Martini, Ambrogio Lorenzetti and Pietro Lorenzetti, and the sculptors Nicola Pisano and Giovanni Pisano.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Derbes, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (CSRE 111, NATIVEAM 211)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kinew, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 243B: Photography and Time

This course examines the relationship between photography and temporality from the nineteenth century until the present day. We will study how the new medium interacted with other nineteenth-century technologies to produce a mechanized and standardized time, as well as attempts to use photography to destabilize such objective temporalities. In the twentieth century, we consider the dominant theorization of photography as an art that addresses time, history, and memory through study of critical texts by Benjamin, Barthes, and Bazin, among others. The course concludes by interrogating the applicability of these analogue theories to contemporary photographic practices. Attention to the technical labor of making photographs and the materiality of photographs in the archive will be central to the course, enabled by visits to the Cantor and Special Collections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beil, K. (PI)
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