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1 - 10 of 24 results for: AFRICAAM ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AFRICAAM 5I: Hamilton: An American Musical (AMSTUD 5I, CSRE 5I, HISTORY 3G)

"Hamilton" is one the most popular and most celebrated musicals in American history. It has received 11 Tony Awards, including best musical, and 16 Tony nominations, the most nominations in Broadway history. It won the Pulitzer Prize and a Grammy Award. The musical draws on the language and rhythms of hip-hop and R & B, genres that are underrepresented in the musical theater tradition. "Hamilton" has redefined the American musical, particularly in terms of sound, casting, and storytelling. What explains the deep cultural impact and acclaim for this play?n nThis interdisciplinary course examines Alexander Hamilton and his world as well as Hamilton: An American Musical through a series of lectures from faculty in History, Theater and Performance Studies, English, Music, and Writing and Rhetoric.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 18B: Jazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present (MUSIC 18B)

Modern jazz styles from Bebop to the current scene. Emphasis is on the significant artists of each style.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Low, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 18C: Sugar and Slavery, Race and Revolution: The Caribbean 1450-1888 (CSRE 108C, HISTORY 8C, HISTORY 108C)

This course examines race and slavery across British, French, and Spanish islands, plus Brazil. The intensity of Caribbean slavery produced societies where more people were enslaved than free. The idea of "black" was invented and contested as Caribbean inhabitants leaned on African roots to shape new cultures. Sugar production sparked global wars and planted the seed of modern financial systems. Black people fought back, in ways large and small, marking the beginning of emancipation with the Haitian Revolution.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mitchell, D. (PI)

AFRICAAM 21: African American Vernacular English (CSRE 21, LINGUIST 65)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond (DANCE 45)

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 45S: The Cold War and the Shaping of Modern Africa (HISTORY 45S)

This course considers the options and obstacles facing Africa during the Cold War, covering the period from the 1940s to the 2000s. Topics include the Cold War histories of Ghana, Algeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire), Tanzania, and South Africa, among others. The legacies of the Cold War for contemporary Africa will also be discussed. This course will also focus on how to manage large source bases and ways to engage with diverse primary sources including film and literature.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wall, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 78: Art + Community: Division, Resilience & Reconciliation (CSRE 78)

Violence and trauma isolates and segregates us. Part of the healing process must be about coming back into community. Freedom is meaningful only insofar as it lifts all, especially those who have been done the most harm. In times of violence and polarization, art can heal and brings people together. In this course, we will explore how we make and sustain community, especially in the face of threats from within and without. We will do this especially through examining how artists and culture workers of color develop and advance practices that build mutuality, criticality, renewal, trust, and joy in the face of ongoing racial injustice and cultural inequity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 101: Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film (AMSTUD 101, CSRE 41)

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAAM 102: From Confederate Monuments to Wikipedia: The Politics of Remembering the Past (CSRE 201, HISTORY 201)

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases issues and careers in public history with guest speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

AFRICAAM 113V: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lamotte, M. (PI)
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