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1 - 10 of 116 results for: all courses

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion; the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing performance, structural concepts, propulsion systems, trajectories, and orbits. The history of aeronautics and astronautics. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; elementary physics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pavone, M. (PI)

AA 116Q: Electric Automobiles and Aircraft

Transportation accounts for nearly one-third of American energy use and greenhouse gas emissions and three-quarters of American oil consumption. It has crucial impacts on climate change, air pollution, resource depletion, and national security. Students wishing to address these issues reconsider how we move, finding sustainable transportation solutions. An introduction to the issue, covering the past and present of transportation and its impacts; examining alternative fuel proposals; and digging deeper into the most promising option: battery electric vehicles. Energy requirements of air, ground, and maritime transportation; design of electric motors, power control systems, drive trains, and batteries; and technologies for generating renewable energy. Two opportunities for hands-on experiences with electric cars. Prerequisites: Introduction to calculus and Physics AP or elementary mechanics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Enge, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 130D: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 108: Essential Statistics for Human Biology (HUMBIO 85A)

Introduction to statistical concepts and methods that are essential to the study of questions in biology, environment, health, epidemiology and related areas. The course will teach and use the computer language R. Topics include distributions, probabilities, likelihood, linear models; illustrations will be based on recent research.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 129A: Cellular Dynamics I: Cell Motility and Adhesion

Cell motility emphasizing role of actin assembly and dynamics coupling actin organization to cell movement. Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix, and remodelling of extracellular matrix in development and disease. Directed cell migration by chemotaxis (neuronal path-finding, immune cells). Cell-cell adhesion, formation of intercellular junctions and mechanisms regulating cell-cell interactions in development and diseases. Emphasis is on experimental logic, methods, problem solving, and interpretation of results. Students present research papers. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2. Prerequisite: Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 141: Biostatistics (STATS 141)

Introductory statistical methods for biological data: describing data (numerical and graphical summaries); introduction to probability; and statistical inference (hypothesis tests and confidence intervals). Intermediate statistical methods: comparing groups (analysis of variance); analyzing associations (linear and logistic regression); and methods for categorical data (contingency tables and odds ratio). Course content integrated with statistical computing in R.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 41: Physical Biology of Macromolecules

Principles of statistical physics, thermodynamics, and kinetics with applications to molecular biology. Topics include entropy, temperature, chemical forces, enzyme kinetics, free energy and its uses, self assembly, cooperative transitions in macromolecules, molecular machines, feedback, and accurate replication. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CHEM 31A, B (or 31X); strongly recommended: PHYSICS 41, CME 100 or MATH 51, and CME 106; or instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Prakash, M. (PI)

BIOE 42: Physical Biology of Cells

Principles of transport, continuum mechanics, and fluids, with applications to cell biology. Topics include random walks, diffusion, Langevin dynamics, transport theory, low Reynolds number flow, and beam theory, with applications including quantitative models of protein trafficking in the cell, mechanics of the cell cytoskeleton, the effects of molecular noise in development, the electromagnetics of nerve impulses, and an introduction to cardiovascular fluid flow. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CHEM 31A, B (or 31X); strongly recommended: CS 106A, PHYSICS 41, CME 100 or MATH 51, and CME 106; or instructor approval. 4 units, Spr (Huang, K)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Quake, S. (PI)

BIOE 101: Systems Biology (BIOE 210)

Complex biological behaviors through the integration of computational modeling and molecular biology. Topics: reconstructing biological networks from high-throughput data and knowledge bases. Network properties. Computational modeling of network behaviors at the small and large scale. Using model predictions to guide an experimental program. Robustness, noise, and cellular variation. Prerequisites: CME 102; BIO 41, BIO 42; or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Covert, M. (PI)

BIOE 103: Systems Physiology and Design

Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics. Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs. Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CME 102; PHY 41; BIO 41, 42; strongly recommended PHY 43; or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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