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21 - 30 of 134 results for: all courses

BIOHOPK 177H: Dynamics and Management of Marine Populations (BIOHOPK 277H)

(Graduate students register for 277H.) Course examines the ecological factors and processes that control natural and harvested marine populations. Course emphasizes mathematical models as tools to assess the dynamics of populations and to derive projections of their demographic fate under different management scenarios. Course objectives will be met by a combination of theoretical lectures, assigned readings and class discussions, case study analysis and interactive computer sessions.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: De Leo, G. (PI)

CEE 29N: Managing Natural Disaster Risk

Natural disasters arise from the interaction of natural processes, such as earthquakes or floods, with human development that suffers safety-related and economic losses. We cannot predict exactly when those disasters will occur, or prevent them entirely, but we have a number of engineering and policy options that can reduce the impacts of such events.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 70N: Water, Public Health, and Engineering

Preference to frosh. Linkages between water, wastewater and public health, with an emphasis on engineering interventions. Topics include the history of water and wastewater infrastructure development in the U.S. and Europe; evolution of epidemiological approaches for water-related health challenges; biological and chemical contaminants in water and wastewater and their management; and current trends and challenges in access to water and sanitation around the world. Identifying ways in which freshwater contributes to human health; exposure routes for water- and sanitation-illness. Classifying illnesses by pathogen type and their geographic distribution. Identifying the health and economic consequences of water- and sanitation-related illnesses; costs and benefits of curative and preventative interventions. Interpreting data related to epidemiological and environmental concepts. No previous experience in engineering is required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 80N: Engineering the Built Environment: An Introduction to Structural Engineering

In this seminar, students will be introduced to the history of modern bridges, buildings and other large-scale structures. Classes will include presentations on transformations in structural design inspired by the development of new materials, increased understanding of hazardous overloads and awareness of environmental impacts. Basic principles of structural engineering and how to calculate material efficiency and structural safety of structural forms will be taught using case studies. The course will include a field trip to a Bay Area large-scale structure, hands-on experience building a tower and computational modeling of bridges, and a paper and presentation on a structure or structural form of interest to the student. The goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding and appreciation of modern structures, influences that have led to new forms, and the impact of structural design on society and the environment. Students from all backgrounds are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 178: Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis (CEE 276)

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

CHEM 134: Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

Classical analysis methods, statistical analyses, chromatography, and spectroscopy will be covered with an emphasis upon quantitative measurements and data analysis. WIM course with full lab reports and oral communication. Concludes with student-developed quantitative project. Prerequisite: Chem 35
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (ENGR 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 60Q: Environmental Regulation and Policy

Preference to sophomores. How environmental policy is formulated in the U.S. How and what type of scientific research is incorporated into decisions. How to determine acceptable risk, the public's right to know of chemical hazards, waste disposal and clean manufacturing, brownfield redevelopment, and new source review regulations. The proper use of science and engineering including media presentation and misrepresentation, public scientific and technical literacy, and emotional reactions. Alternative models to formulation of environmental policy. Political and economic forces, and stakeholder discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Libicki, S. (PI)

CHEMENG 70Q: Masters of Disaster

Preference to sophomores. For students interested in science, engineering, politics, and the law. Learn from past disasters to avoid future ones. How disasters can be tracked to failures in the design process. The roles of engineers, artisans, politicians, lawyers, and scientists in the design of products. Failure as rooted in oversight in adhering to the design process. Student teams analyze real disasters and design new products presumably free from the potential for disastrous outcomes.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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