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21 - 25 of 25 results for: CARDCOURSES::eng ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MS&E 330: Law, Order & Algorithms (CSRE 230, SOC 279)

Data and algorithms are rapidly transforming law enforcement and criminal justice, including how police officers are deployed, how discrimination is detected, and how sentencing, probation, and parole terms are set. Modern computational and statistical methods offer the promise of greater efficiency, equity, and transparency, but their use also raises complex legal, social, and ethical questions. In this course, we analyze recent court decisions, discuss methods from machine learning and game theory, and examine the often subtle relationship between law, public policy, and statistics. The class is centered around several data-intensive projects in criminal justice that students work on in interdisciplinary teams. Students work closely with criminal justice agencies to carry out these projects, with the goal of producing research that impacts policy. Students with a background in statistics, computer science, law, and/or public policy are encouraged to participate. Enrollment is limited, and project teams will be selected during the first week of class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Goel, S. (PI)

PUBLPOL 147: Ending Poverty with Technology (SOC 157)

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Grusky, D. (PI)

PUBLPOL 148: Ending Poverty with Technology: A Practicum. (SOC 158)

Will robots, automation, and technology eliminate work and create a large poverty-sticken dependent class? Or will they eliminate poverty, free us from the tyranny of work, and usher in a new society defined by leisure and creative pursuits? This two-quarter class is dedicated to exploring new theories about poverty while at the same time incubating applied technology solutions. The first quarter is devoted to examining the theory of technology-based solutions to poverty, and the second quarter is devoted to planning a viable technology-based product that will reduce poverty. This product may then be built in a follow-up Using Tech for Good (Computer Science 50) class in the first quarter of 2018 (but class participants are not required to take that follow-up class). The course is premised on the view that innovative solutions to poverty will be based on new conversations and an authentic collaboration between Silicon Valley and leaders from education, government, and low-income communities
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 157: Ending Poverty with Technology (PUBLPOL 147)

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 158: Ending Poverty with Technology: A Practicum. (PUBLPOL 148)

Will robots, automation, and technology eliminate work and create a large poverty-sticken dependent class? Or will they eliminate poverty, free us from the tyranny of work, and usher in a new society defined by leisure and creative pursuits? This two-quarter class is dedicated to exploring new theories about poverty while at the same time incubating applied technology solutions. The first quarter is devoted to examining the theory of technology-based solutions to poverty, and the second quarter is devoted to planning a viable technology-based product that will reduce poverty. This product may then be built in a follow-up Using Tech for Good (Computer Science 50) class in the first quarter of 2018 (but class participants are not required to take that follow-up class). The course is premised on the view that innovative solutions to poverty will be based on new conversations and an authentic collaboration between Silicon Valley and leaders from education, government, and low-income communities
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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