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41 - 50 of 168 results for: all courses

CS 54N: Great Ideas in Computer Science

Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to freshmen. Covers the intellectual tradition of computer science emphasizing ideas that reflect the most important milestones in the history of the discipline. No prior experience with programming is assumed. Topics include programming and problem solving; implementing computation in hardware; algorithmic efficiency; the theoretical limits of computation; cryptography and security; and the philosophy behind artificial intelligence.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 101: Introduction to Computing Principles

Introduces the essential ideas of computing: data representation, algorithms, programming "code", computer hardware, networking, security, and social issues. Students learn how computers work and what they can do through hands-on exercises. In particular, students will see the capabilities and weaknesses of computer systems so they are not mysterious or intimidating. Course features many small programming exercises, although no prior programming experience is assumed or required. CS101 is not a complete programming course such as CS106A. CS101 is effectively an alternative to CS105. A laptop computer is recommended for the in-class exercises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 105: Introduction to Computers

For non-technical majors. What computers are and how they work. Practical experience in programming. Construction of computer programs and basic design techniques. A survey of Internet technology and the basics of computer hardware. Students in technical fields and students looking to acquire programming skills should take 106A or 106X. Students with prior computer science experience at the level of 106 or above require consent of instructor. Prerequisite: minimal math skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106A: Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited. Alternative versions of CS106A are available which cover most of the same material but in different programming languages: Java [Fall, Win, Spr, or Sum qtr enroll in CS106A Section 1] Javascript [Fall qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 2] Python [Winter or Spring qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 3]
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106B: Programming Abstractions (ENGR 70B)

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106X: Programming Abstractions (Accelerated) (ENGR 70X)

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Additional advanced material and more challenging projects. Winter quarter assignments will be based in CS department research. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Winter quarter enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 107: Computer Organization and Systems

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer systems. Explores how computer systems execute programs and manipulate data, working from the C programming language down to the microprocessor. Topics covered include: the C programming language, data representation, machine-level code, computer arithmetic, elements of code compilation, memory organization and management, and performance evaluation and optimization. Prerequisites: 106B or X, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 108: Object-Oriented Systems Design

Software design and construction in the context of large OOP libraries. Taught in Java. Topics: OOP design, design patterns, testing, graphical user interface (GUI) OOP libraries, software engineering strategies, approaches to programming in teams. Prerequisite: 107.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 109: Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists

Topics include: counting and combinatorics, random variables, conditional probability, independence, distributions, expectation, point estimation, and limit theorems. Applications of probability in computer science including machine learning and the use of probability in the analysis of algorithms. Prerequisites: 103, 106B or X, multivariate calculus at the level of MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 110: Principles of Computer Systems

Principles and practice of engineering of computer software and hardware systems. Topics include: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; security, and encryption; and performance optimizations. Prerequisite: 107.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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