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21 - 30 of 170 results for: COMPLIT

COMPLIT 111: German Capstone: Reading Franz Kafka (COMPLIT 311C, GERMAN 190, GERMAN 390, JEWISHST 147, JEWISHST 349)

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers. (Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 112: Oscar Wilde and the French Decadents (COMPLIT 312, FRENCH 112, FRENCH 312)

Close reading of Oscar Wilde's work together with major texts and authors of 19th-century French Decadence, including Symbolism, l'art pour l'art, and early Modernism. Points of contact between Wilde and avant-garde Paris salons; provocative, creative intersections between (homo)erotic and aesthetic styles, transgression; literary and cultural developments from Baudelaire to Mallarmé, Huysmans, Flaubert, Rachilde, Lorrain, and Proust compared with Wilde¿s Salomé, Picture of Dorian Gray, and critical writings; relevant historical and philosophical contexts. All readings in English; all student levels welcome.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 114: Masterpieces: Kafka (GERMAN 150, JEWISHST 145)

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 115: Nabokov in the Transnational Context (COMPLIT 315, SLAVIC 156, SLAVIC 356)

Nabokov's techniques of migration and camouflage as he inhabits the literary and historical contexts of St. Petersburg, Berlin, Paris, America, and Switzerland. His early and late stories, last Russian novel "The Gift," "Lolita" (the novel and screenplay), and "Pale Fire." Readings in English. Russian speakers will be encouraged to read Russian texts in original.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 117: Women Writing War

War has long been recognized as a central theme in literature across traditions, yet little recognition has been given to women¿s voices in war writing. This course will explore female perspectives on America's wars and armed conflicts of the Twentieth Century, from World War One to the war in Afghanistan and the ¿War on Terror.¿ Readings will include poetry, fiction, memoir and reportage by American and international writers such as Gertrude Stein, Amy Lowell, Denise Levertov, Theresa Kak Kyung Cha, Dunya Mikhail, and Solmaz Sharif. We will explore such topics as the gendering of war and of mourning, the poetry of witness, the representation of violence, and political censorship and surveillance. All readings will be in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alford, L. (PI)

COMPLIT 121: Poems, Poetry, Worlds

What is poetry? How does it speak in many voices to questions of history, society, and personal experience? Why does it matter? The reading and interpretation of poetry in crosscultural comparison as experience, invention, form, sound, knowledge, and part of the world. Readings include: classical Chinese poetry, English Romantic poetry, and modern Arabic, American, Brazilian, Japanese, German, Spanish poetry, with specific attention to landscape, terrain, the environment, and the role of the poet.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barletta, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 122: Literature as Performance: The Potentials of Theater

An introduction to the "theatrical" dimensions of literature in different cultures based on a view of the staging arts as a specific segment within phenomena of "performance". Documentation and discussions of the history of western drama as a central axis within the debate about the cultural status of other forms of performance art that are normally not culturally canonized within this genre (eg. sports).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 123: The Novel (ENGLISH 184)

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Great Depression to the present.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 125: Past Desire Made Present: The Traditions of Erotic Poetry in Medieval Iran and Europe

Aims to make present and accessible, to our early 21st-century experience, convergences and differences between medieval Persian and medieval European love poetry. Poetry will be dealt with as a discursive and institutional means through which it is possible to make present and tangible that which is absent -- both in space and time. If we accept that medieval Persian and European love poetry conjured up moods of homo- and heteroerotic desire for contemporary audiences, then this desire can also become present for us today through a close reading of those same texts.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 125A: The Gothic Novel

The Gothic novel and its relatives from its invention by Walpole in The Castle of Otranto of 1764. Readings include: Northanger Abbey, The Italian, The Monk, Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, Great Expectations, and Dracula. What defines the Gothic as it evolves from one specific novel to a mode that makes its way into a range of fictional types?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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