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1 - 10 of 16 results for: IPS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

IPS 203: Issues in International Economics

Topics in international trade and international trade policy: trade, growth and poverty, the World Trade Organization (WTO), regionalism versus multilateralism, the political economy of trade policy, trade and labor, trade and the environment, and trade policies for developing economies. Prerequisite: ECON 51, ECON 166.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 208A: International Justice (HUMRTS 102)

This course will examine the arc of an atrocity. It begins with an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship on the causes and enablers of mass violence genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and state repression. It then considers political and legal responses ranging from humanitarian intervention (within and without the Responsibility to Protect framework), sanctions, commissions of inquiry, and accountability mechanisms, including criminal trials before international and domestic tribunals. The course will also explore the range of transitional justice mechanisms available to policymakers as societies emerge from periods of violence and repression, including truth commissions, illustrations, and amnesties. Coming full circle, the course will evaluate current efforts aimed at atrocity prevention, rather than response, including President Obama¿s atrocities prevention initiative. Readings address the philosophical underpinnings of justice, questions of institutional design, and the way in which different societies have balanced competing policy imperatives. Cross-listed with LAW 5033.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 209: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. Enrollment must be split between Autumn and Winter Quarters for a total of 8 units.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 213: International Mediation and Civil Wars

This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh). In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 219: Intelligence and National Security

How intelligence supports U.S. national security and foreign policies. How it has been used by U.S. presidents to become what it is today; organizational strengths and weaknesses; how it is monitored and held accountable to the goals of a democratic society; and successes and failures. Current intelligence analyses and national intelligence estimates are produced in support of simulated policy deliberations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fingar, T. (PI)

IPS 241: International Security in a Changing World (POLISCI 114S)

This class surveys the most pressing global security problems facing the world today and includes an award-winning two-day international crisis simulation. Past guest lecturers have included former Secretary of Defense William Perry, former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Gen. Karl Eikenberry, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Major topics covered: changing types of warfare, ethics and conduct of war, nuclear proliferation, insurgency and terrorism, Russia, and ISIS. No prior background in international relations is necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 244: U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia

Case study approach to the study of contemporary U.S. policy towards Japan, Korea, and China. Historical evolution of U.S. foreign policy and the impact of issues such as democratization, human rights, trade, security relations, military modernization, and rising nationalism on U.S. policy. Case studies include U.S.-Japan trade tensions, anti-Americanism in Korea, and cross-straits relations between China and Taiwan. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 250: International Conflict Resolution (PSYCH 383)

Same as LAW 5009; formerly Law 656) This seminar examines the challenges of managing and resolving intractable political and violent intergroup and international conflicts. Employing an interdisciplinary approach drawing on social psychology, political science, game theory, and international law, the course identifies various tactical, psychological, and structural barriers that can impede the achievement of efficient solutions to conflicts. We will explore a conceptual framework for conflict management and resolution that draws not only on theoretical insights, but also builds on historical examples and practical experience in the realm of conflict resolution. This approach examines the need for the parties to conflicts to address the following questions in order to have prospects of creating peaceful relationships: (1) how can the parties to conflict develop a vision of a mutually bearable shared future; (2) how can parties develop trust in the enemy; (3) how can each side be persuaded, as part of a negotiated settlement, to accept losses that it will find very painful; and (4) how do we overcome the perceptions of injustice that each side are likely to have towards any compromise solution? We will consider both particular conflicts, such as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the South African transition to majority rule, as well as cross-cutting issues, such as the role international legal rules play in facilitating or impeding conflict resolution, the intragroup dynamics that affect intergroup conflict resolution efforts, and the role of criminal accountability for atrocities following civil wars. Special Instructions: Section 01: Grades will be based on class participation, written assignments, and a final exam. Section 02: Up to five students, with consent of the instructor, will have the option to write an independent research paper for Research (R) credit in lieu of the written assignments and final exam for Section 01. After the term begins, students (max 5) accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

IPS 264: Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia

Introduction to India, Af-Pak and China. Analyzes historical forces that shaped the region, recent history and current state of key countries: the economic and political rise of India and China; rise of the Taliban and Al Qaeda in Afghanistan; Pakistan's government, military, and mullahs; and China's impact on the region. nExplores U.S. policy in depth: U.S. intervention in- and upcoming withdrawal from Afghanistan, U.S. relations with Pakistan and India, the "pivot to Asia" and its implications for US-China relations and the strategic balance in Asia. nSatisfies the IPS policy writing requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Manuel, A. (PI)
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