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21 - 30 of 56 results for: TAPS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

TAPS 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (AFRICAAM 156, CSRE 156T, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Elam, H. (PI)

TAPS 156V: Vital Signs: Performance in the 21st Century (ARTSTUDI 256V, TAPS 256V)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The serie more »
The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The series is curated by the Los Angeles-based artist Cassils, who has been listed by the Huffington Post as 'one of ten transgender artists who are changing the landscape of contemporary art' and has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Cassils's curatorial vision is to present established performance artists alongside emerging artists. Each quarter, a pair of artists will visit Stanford for two days (Thursday-Friday). On day one of their visit they will offer a workshop or a public performance, and on the second day they will engage in a public dialogue. The class will meet each quarter for three weeks: before, during, and after the artists' visit. This way, the students will have an opportunity to prepare for the visit, engage with the visiting artists, and reflect on their work. They will receive their grades upon completion of the class, in the spring of 2018.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 165: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 167: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (CLASSICS 112)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 110.) Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: McCall, M. (PI)

TAPS 170B: Directing Workshop: The Actor-Director Dialogue (TAPS 372)

This course focuses on the actor-director dialogue. We will work with actors and directors developing approaches to collaboration that make the actor-director dialogue in theater.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 176N: The Inside Story

The Inside Story is a workshop that focuses on the generation of autobiographical material by exploring the connections between biology and biography. Students will gather autobiological and autobiographical material, investigate stories of their bodies and explore `gut feelings¿. They will work on individual and group exercises looking at cellular and body memory from which they will create text, gesture, image, performance and installation. The exercises will include autobiographical writing prompts, body memory exercises, Yin Yoga, and body mapping.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Paris, H. (PI)

TAPS 177C: Creating a Musical (MUSIC 184D)

This practical, hands on class in the making of musicals explores all aspects of creating musical theater, including writing, composing, producing, directing, designing, and casting this most American of theater genres. The class will include direct engagement and discussion with the producers and artists of TheatreWorks Silicon Valley¿s production of The Bridges of Madison County, book by Marsha Norman and music by Jason Robert Brown, including off-campus field trip to rehearsal of the show. The class will explore the creation of several renowned musicals including Stephen Sondheim¿s Merrily We Roll Along, and will include live Skype interviews with Broadway composers Andrew Lippa (The Wild Party), Paul Gordon (Jane Eyre), and David Hein and Irene Sankoff (Come from Away, winner of the 2017 Drama Desk Award for Best Musical). The quarter will culminate in the creation, production, and performance of several mini-musicals created by members of the class. Instructor Robert Kelley is the Founding Artistic Director of TheatreWorks Silicon Valley, where he has directed 170 productions, including many world and regional premieres.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kelley, R. (PI)

TAPS 177W: Workshop with Young Jean Lee (TAPS 277W)

Students will collaborate on and perform a work-in-progress by Young Jean Lee
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 178C: Writing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 278C)

This workshop will guide students through the process of writing a full-length, non-musical play, and will focus on helping students to find their own voices. Students will be required to write every week and share their work with the class, completing a full-length first draft by the end of the term. This class will be geared towards generating new material, rather than on editing in response to critiques (which will be covered in my spring course, ¿Editing a Full-Length Play¿). We will read plays by contemporary playwrights and discuss topics such as the relationship between ¿naturalistic¿ and ¿experimental¿ theater; writing about unfamiliar subjects; and writing what you¿re afraid to write. Playwriting experience not required. Students must apply to be considered for this course.nnAPPLICATION PROCESSnApplication materials:n1. Write a five-minute play (no longer than one page) that uses no spoken or sung words. Only stage directions/descriptions allowed. Other than that, there are no more »
This workshop will guide students through the process of writing a full-length, non-musical play, and will focus on helping students to find their own voices. Students will be required to write every week and share their work with the class, completing a full-length first draft by the end of the term. This class will be geared towards generating new material, rather than on editing in response to critiques (which will be covered in my spring course, ¿Editing a Full-Length Play¿). We will read plays by contemporary playwrights and discuss topics such as the relationship between ¿naturalistic¿ and ¿experimental¿ theater; writing about unfamiliar subjects; and writing what you¿re afraid to write. Playwriting experience not required. Students must apply to be considered for this course.nnAPPLICATION PROCESSnApplication materials:n1. Write a five-minute play (no longer than one page) that uses no spoken or sung words. Only stage directions/descriptions allowed. Other than that, there are no rules. You could have a cast of 100 with live elephants onstage. Don¿t worry about using proper play structure or formatting, or about making the play exactly five minutes, or anything technical. This is not about testing your knowledge of how to write a play. Write something that you personally would love to see onstage. It doesn¿t have to resemble a typical play in any way, unless you want it to. This will be the most important part of your application, because it will show me what interests you creatively.n2. Write a letter (no longer than one page) briefly describing your personal background, your artistic experience (including non-theater writing, visual arts, music, dance, etc.), and your theater background, if any. The letter should also include why you¿re interested in taking this class and what you hope to get out of it.n3. Include a photo of yourself where your face is clearly visible (no sunglasses and no full-length shots please).nPlease email your applications to yjlapplications@gmail.com, indicating in the subject line which of my classes you are applying for--WRITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY or COLLABORATIVE THEATER-MAKING. If you are applying for both, write both class titles in your subject line and include in your letter (no longer than two pages) your reasons for wanting to take each class.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 183E: Singing for Musicals (MUSIC 183E)

This course provides training in vocal technique, stylistic musical phrasing, and acting for students interested in performing musical theater. Students will learn about the physical process of singing, including posture, breath support, and vocal exercises. They will incorporate vocal technique with the study of phrasing in different styles of Broadway repertoire, and apply both to the art of acting the song. Each student will work on solo selections and ensembles, and sing in most classes. Through understanding vocal technique, students will become more confident and joyful performers. The course will culminate in a final public workshop performance
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jennings, K. (PI)
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