2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

11 - 20 of 62 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 116B: Anthropology of the Environment (ANTHRO 216B)

This seminar interrogates the history of anthropology's approach to the environment, beginning with early functionalist, structuralist, and Marxist accounts of human-environment relationships. It builds towards more recent developments in the field, focusing on nonhuman and relational ontologies as well as current projects on the intersections of nature, capital, politics, and landscape histories. At the end of this class, students will be familiar with the intellectual histories of environmental anthropology and contemporary debates and tensions around questions of ethics, agency, environment, and historical causality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 121B: Vital Infrastructures: The Foundations of Modern Life

Infrastructure describes the material grids that exist beneath society, economy and culture: the foundation upon which everyday life rests and depends. While meant to remain invisible, out of sight and out of mind, diverse infrastructures have become lightning rods for political protest and demands for justice, rights, and a good life. From anti-dam activism in India, to campaigns for clean drinking water in South Africa, to transportation networks in urban Bolivia, and to the energy networks of the United States, infrastructure reveals the connections and disconnections of the globalized world. Taking an anthropological perspective, this course asks: why has infrastructure taken on vital importance to the modern nation-state? What do infrastructural histories reveal about the vital political ideals like freedom, development, equality, and nature? When does infrastructure take on a life of its own, undermining even the best laid plans? What happens when infrastructures fail? Through multi-disciplinary readings and exploratory assignments, this course challenges students see the world beneath their feet in new ways and to trace the material connections that define and sustain modern life itself.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 128: Visual Studies

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 135: Cultural Studies (ANTHRO 235)

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ebron, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 148: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 156: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 256)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 159C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 259C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 179: Cultures of Disease: Cancer and HIV/AIDS (ENGLISH 179)

History, politics, science, and anthropology of cancer; political and economic issues of disease and health care in the U.S., including the ethics and economics of health care provision, the pharmaceutical industry, carcinogen production, and research priorities.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints