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51 - 60 of 190 results for: MUSIC

MUSIC 125: Individual Undergraduate Projects in Composition

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Prerequisites: music major, and one quarter of 123.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 128: Stanford Laptop Orchestra: Composition, Coding, and Performance (CS 170)

Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 146J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (CSRE 146J, MUSIC 246J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 150P: The Changing World of Popular Music (ARTSINST 150)

This course will cover changes in the business, economics, and practices of the popular music industry. It will provide a brief historical overview of the industry and its business models. The majority of the course will focus on the industry as it works today and on forces that are causing it to change rapidly. The course will feature guest artists and executives with current experience in the field, as well as project-based assignments designed to give students hands-on experience.Topics will include: Economics and business models of commercial music business,Technology and music production, Technology and music distribution, Technology and marketing, Leadership in the music industry: case studies, Managing creative projects, Copyright and legal issues. Attendance at first class required. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: LeBoeuf, J. (PI)

MUSIC 151G: Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells the Story: Identity and Representation in American Musical Theater (TAPS 154I)

Throughout the twentieth century and into the present day, musicals have sought to tell stories about a broad range of American experiences and engage with complex social issues. Foremost among these themes are the topics of race and cultural appropriation, immigration and citizenship, and LGBT lives and queer identity. Even as they seek to represent diverse perspectives and facilitate progressive social change, musicals just as often can reinforce and replicate troubling conceptions surrounding gender, race, sexual identity. This course will examine works of musical theater from the 1920s to the present day in order to understand how each of these individual works, and the musical as a genre and institution, navigates this forward-and-backward tension surrounding these three topics. Our focus will be on commercially successful stage and screen musicals that cover the span of almost a hundred years, from The Jazz Singer (1927) to Hamilton (2015). In the course of lectures and discussio more »
Throughout the twentieth century and into the present day, musicals have sought to tell stories about a broad range of American experiences and engage with complex social issues. Foremost among these themes are the topics of race and cultural appropriation, immigration and citizenship, and LGBT lives and queer identity. Even as they seek to represent diverse perspectives and facilitate progressive social change, musicals just as often can reinforce and replicate troubling conceptions surrounding gender, race, sexual identity. This course will examine works of musical theater from the 1920s to the present day in order to understand how each of these individual works, and the musical as a genre and institution, navigates this forward-and-backward tension surrounding these three topics. Our focus will be on commercially successful stage and screen musicals that cover the span of almost a hundred years, from The Jazz Singer (1927) to Hamilton (2015). In the course of lectures and discussions we will build a working vocabulary for analyzing the musical's salient components including music and lyrics, staging, libretto, choreography, and cinematography and engage with key scholarship from musicology, performance studies, film studies, and American studies. The final week of class will examine current and planned musical theater productions on campus using the tools and perspectives from the previous three parts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 153: Online Jamming and Concert Technology

Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chafe, C. (PI)

MUSIC 154F: Electroacoustic Music Analysis

This course will explore the most important methodologies for analysis of electroacoustic music that have been proposed in the literature. Class meetings include lectures, student discussions of relevant literature and listening sessions. Assignments include weekly readings, homework, and a final project. Basic musical proficiency is required. Experience with programming, music analysis, or music perception/cognition is desirable.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 158: Stanford Community Chorus

Chorus members explore many different types of music and singing in a fun and supportive environment, including folk, spirituals, popular songs, and traditional choral music. The course culminates in an informal performance. No audition is required to join; experienced music readers and non-readers alike are welcome. The ensemble is open to both Stanford students and community members. There is a $25 fee for music. Offered in collaboration with Stanford Continuing Studies. Enrollment limited to 15 students and 30 community members. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Savage, K. (PI)

MUSIC 159: Early Music Singers

Small choir specializing in Medieval, Renaissance, and early Baroque vocal music. One major concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit for a total of 15 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: ( http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mahrt, W. (PI)

MUSIC 159Z: Early Music Singers

Small choir specializing in Medieval, Renaissance, and early Baroque vocal music. One major concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit for a total of 15 times for 0 unit. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: ( http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Mahrt, W. (PI)
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