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661 - 670 of 795 results for: all courses

PSYCH 150: Race and Crime (CSRE 150A)

The goal of this course is to examine social psychological perspectives on race, crime, and punishment in the United States. Readings will be drawn not only from psychology, but also from sociology, criminology, economics, and legal studies. We will consider the manner in which social psychological variables may operate at various points in the crimina; justice system- from policing, to sentencing, to imprisonment, to re-entry. Conducted as a seminar. Students interested in participating should attend the first session and complete online application for permission at https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 154: Judgment and Decision-Making

Survey of research on how we make assessments and decisions particularly in situations involving uncertainty. Emphasis will be on instances where behavior deviates from optimality. Overview of recent works examining the neural basis of judgment and decision-making.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 155: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 161: Emotion (PSYCH 261)

(Graduate students register for 261.) The scientific study of emotion. Topics: models of emotion, emotion antecedents, emotional responses (facial, subjective, and physiological), functions of emotion, emotion regulation, individual differences, and health implications. Focus is on experimentally tractable ideas.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 168: Emotion Regulation (PSYCH 268)

(Graduate students register for 268.) The scientific study of emotion regulation. Topics: historical antecedents, conceptual foundations, autonomic and neural bases, individual differences, developmental and cultural aspects, implications for psychological and physical health. Focus is on experimentally tractable ideas.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 170: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 164, COMM 264, POLISCI 124L)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

PSYCH 175: Social Cognition and Learning in Early Childhood

Social cognition - the ability to recognize others, understand their behaviors, and reason about their thoughts - is a critical component of what makes us human. What are the basic elements of social cognition, and what do children understand about other people's actions, thoughts, and feelings? How do these capacities help us understand the world, as learning unfolds in the first few years of life? This course will take a deeper look at the intersection of social cognition and cognitive development to better understand how children learn about the world.nnStudents will explore various topics on social cognition with an emphasis on (but not limited to) developmental perspectives, including face perception, action understanding, Theory of Mind, communication, and altruism, and think about how these abilities might be linked to the developmental changes in children¿s understanding of the world. The course will encourage students to think hard about the fundamental questions about the hum more »
Social cognition - the ability to recognize others, understand their behaviors, and reason about their thoughts - is a critical component of what makes us human. What are the basic elements of social cognition, and what do children understand about other people's actions, thoughts, and feelings? How do these capacities help us understand the world, as learning unfolds in the first few years of life? This course will take a deeper look at the intersection of social cognition and cognitive development to better understand how children learn about the world.nnStudents will explore various topics on social cognition with an emphasis on (but not limited to) developmental perspectives, including face perception, action understanding, Theory of Mind, communication, and altruism, and think about how these abilities might be linked to the developmental changes in children¿s understanding of the world. The course will encourage students to think hard about the fundamental questions about the human mind and how it interacts with other minds, and the value of studying young children in addressing these questions. Students should expect to read, present, and discuss theoretical and empirical research articles and to develop original research proposals as a final project. nnStudents will have an opportunity to develop their proposals into a research project in PSYCH 187, a lab course offered every other year in Spring (next offer expected to be Spring 2018) as a sequel to this course. This course fulfills the WIM requirement. nnPrerequisitesPsych60 or Psych141, or see instructor
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gweon, H. (PI)

PSYCH 180: Social Psychological Perspectives on Stereotyping and Prejudice

The seminar will review classic and current literature from social psychology on stereotyping and prejudice. We will cover the perceiver's persepective including the formation and maintenance of stereotypes, the functions and costs of stereotyping, and stereotype change. We will also explore how targets are affected by stereotypes and prejudice, as well as intergroup relations. Recent research concerning the role of cognitive, affective, motivational and behavioral processes will be emphasized.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 19Q: Measuring the Performance of Governments in the U.S. (ECON 19Q)

Spending by federal, state, and local governments accounts for about one-third of U.S. GDP and governments employ more than one-in-seven workers in the U.S. For most U.S. residents, government is represented by a complicated web of federal, state, and local policies. There is an increasingly contentious debate about the proper role of the government and regarding the impact of specific government policies. This debate is rarely grounded in a common set of facts. In this seminar, we will explore how each level of government interacts with U.S. residents through government services, public programs, taxes, and regulations. We will examine financial results for different levels of government while considering the net effects of government intervention on the health and economic well-being of individuals and families. Particular attention will be paid to certain sectors (e.g. education, health care, etc.) and to certain groups (e.g. those in poverty, the elderly, etc.). Along the way we will accumulate a set of metrics to assess the performance of each level of government while highlighting the formidable challenges of such an exercise. Prerequisite: Econ 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 51: Microeconomics for Policy (IPS 204A, PUBLPOL 301A)

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PublPol 51 as a substitute for the Econ 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take Econ 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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