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381 - 390 of 854 results for: all courses

HISTORY 95N: Maps in the Modern World

Preference to freshmen. Focus is on cutting-edge research. Topics: the challenge of grasping the globe as a whole; geography's roots in empire; maps as propaganda and as commodities; the cultural production of scale; and the cartography of imaginery worlds.Sources include resources in the Green Library Special Collections and in the Stanford Spatial History Lab.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 98: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 198. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) Do you want to understand Modern China? If so, this course is for you. And even if you've studied China before, or grew up there, this course will deepen and challenge your perspectives. Through vivid and propulsive lectures - drawing on fiction, film, political essays, and more - Professor Tom Mullaney will chart out China¿s historical transformations from 1800 to today, equipping you to speak and write intelligently about Chinese politics, society, economy, culture, gender, ethnicity, and international affairs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 98N: Beijing, Shanghai, and the Structure of Modern China

This course examines the transformation of China from the late empire to the present by studying the nature of its two greatest cities. Topics examined will include the evolving physical structure of the cities, their changing relations to the Chinese state and the outside world, shifting understandings of the urban population/crowd, the changing nature of time, new modes of self-definition through patterns of consumption, the cities as topics of literature and movies, and the nature of urban modernity.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 101: The Greeks (CLASSICS 83)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 101.) 250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 102: History of the International System (INTNLREL 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the development of the Cold War and nuclear weapons; the rise of China, India, and the EU; and the impact of Islamic terrorism. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenge of environment, health, poverty, and climate issues to the functioning of the system.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 102A: The Romans (CLASSICS 84)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 60.) How did a tiny village create a huge empire and shape the world, and why did it fail? Roman history, imperialism, politics, social life, economic growth, and religious change. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on Coursework.
Terms: given next year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 103D: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 112, EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 103E: The International History of Nuclear Weapons (POLISCI 116)

An introduction to the history of nuclear weapons from World War II to the present. The focus is on politics, but the role of technology transfer, whether legal or illicit, in the development of nuclear weapons will be examined; so too will the theories about the military and political utility of nuclear weapons. We will look at the efforts to control and abolish nuclear weapons and at the international institutions created to reduce the danger of nuclear war.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Holloway, D. (PI)

HISTORY 103F: The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History (HISTORY 3F)

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 104: Introduction to Geospatial Humanities (HISTORY 4)

This course introduces undergraduate students to the theory and methods of the geospatial humanities, understood broadly as the application of GIS techniques and other quantitative methods in the humanistic study of social and cultural patterns in past and present settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)
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