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GERMAN 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 275: Outer Space Exploration in Germany in the Twentieth Century (HISTORY 237G)

Since the nineteenth century, Germans, like their counterparts around the world, have considered the meaning and the role of humanity in outer space. As space travel developed from a dream to a reality, and as Germany changed borders and political systems among empires, dictatorships, socialist states, and capitalist states, German interest in spaceflight remained, although the meaning found in the stars changed dramatically. This course considers Germans' dreams of and predictions for outer space travel alongside German technological developments in spaceflight. It includes the different German states throughout the century, including Weimar Germany, National Socialism, East Germany, and West Germany. The course looks at science fiction films and novels, newspaper reports, scientific developments, and German space engineering projects, which together demonstrate how and why space travel often found high levels of support in Germany. Students will engage in historical and cultural analysis through course readings, discussions, and assignments.nNOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take this course for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Anderson, C. (PI)

GLOBAL 101: Critical Issues in Global Affairs

Gateway course for students wishing to pursue a Global Studies minor in one of six specializations: African, European, Islamic, Iranian, Latin American, and South Asian Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

GLOBAL 106: Populism and the Erosion of Democracy (POLISCI 140P)

What is populism, and how much of a threat to democracy is it? How different is it from fascism or other anti-liberal movements? This course explores the conditions for the rise of populism, evaluates how much of a danger it poses, and examines the different forms it takes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GLOBAL 137: Islam in America (CSRE 135, RELIGST 135)

This course explores the history of Islam in North America with special emphasis on the experience of Muslims in the United States. Contrary to popularly held belief, Muslims have been critical participants in the construction of American identity from the 16th century onwards when Muslim slaves were forcibly brought to Colonial America. Our course will explore the diverse ways Muslims in America have imagined, practiced, and negotiated their religious identity. We will move chronologically, and we will focus upon three crucial themes: the convergence of constructions of racial, religious, and national identities in America; the ever-shifting terrain of notions of authority and authenticity amongst Muslims in America; and global resonances of the practices and ideas of American Muslims.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morgan, A. (PI)

GS 167: Technology and National Security (GS 267, MS&E 193, MS&E 293)

Explores the relation between technology, war, and national security policy from early history to modern day, focusing on current U.S. national security challenges and the role that technology plays in shaping our understanding and response to these challenges. Topics include the interplay between technology and modes of warfare; dominant and emerging technologies such as nuclear weapons, cyber, sensors, stealth, and biological; security challenges to the U.S.; and the U.S. response and adaptation to new technologies of military significance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 1C: Global History: Empires, Technology, and Modernity

How did the power of states evolve around the globe during the modern period? And how did it shape global experiences of modernity? In this course we will examine the development of technologies of rule from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, from the age of empires and revolutions, through the world wars, the Cold War, and the war on terror. We will look at the political, social, cultural, and intellectual roots behind their invention and their results on the ground. In doing so, we will attempt to grasp the way they have shaped the history and experience of modernity. The course offers a broad overview not of a particular region but of the wider set of processes and technologies that connected the historical experiences of far-flung human communities. Topics include the evolution of government bureaucracies and classificatory schemes; the industrial revolution; technologies of rebellion and revolution; technologies of trade, including maps, ships, guns, and railroads; libera more »
How did the power of states evolve around the globe during the modern period? And how did it shape global experiences of modernity? In this course we will examine the development of technologies of rule from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, from the age of empires and revolutions, through the world wars, the Cold War, and the war on terror. We will look at the political, social, cultural, and intellectual roots behind their invention and their results on the ground. In doing so, we will attempt to grasp the way they have shaped the history and experience of modernity. The course offers a broad overview not of a particular region but of the wider set of processes and technologies that connected the historical experiences of far-flung human communities. Topics include the evolution of government bureaucracies and classificatory schemes; the industrial revolution; technologies of rebellion and revolution; technologies of trade, including maps, ships, guns, and railroads; liberalism's urban technologies; airpower; the history and practice of development; camps and borders; and anti-colonial critiques of these various tools of empire. Through these, we will attempt to make sense of how the technologies of imperial power have shaped the bonds and inequalities of global capitalism and the world of nation-states. We will focus on different case studies each week to trace the unfolding of large-scale processes. Students will read primary sources (produced in the period) and historians¿ analyses of the events from a distance. The class is appropriate for beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students, and may be taken for different levels of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 3F: The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History (HISTORY 103F)

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 4: Introduction to Geospatial Humanities (HISTORY 104)

This course introduces undergraduate students to the theory and methods of the geospatial humanities, understood broadly as the application of GIS techniques and other quantitative methods in the humanistic study of social and cultural patterns in past and present settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)
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