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1 - 10 of 45 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CSRE 1A: My Journey: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others. The course may be taken for either one or two units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Jimenez, T. (PI)

CSRE 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 21: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin' and rappin'), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 29SI: Migration is Beautiful: Histories, Realities, and Policies of Immigrant Justice

We will begin the course by analyzing the history of immigration politics and policy in the United States. How did immigrants fit into and complicate the constructed racial hierarchy throughout history? What characterized the waves of migration to the United States? How have undocumented been marginalized, and what are the ways in which the community responded? In looking at this history, we will learn about the effects it has had on the immigrant community as it relates to the long-lasting disparate impacts in education, criminal justice, and political representation. nnImmigrants make up a profoundly diverse community that is often mischaracterized. We will discuss the varying perceptions of immigrants today and how they impact attitudes and current policies. Although the course and the trip are designed with a focus on national immigration policy, we will also spend some time in this course narrowing in and using the Bay Area as a case study
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Jimenez, T. (PI)

CSRE 34SI: The Chicago Gap: Bridging Latinx Youth Education

By the year 2050, Latinos will make up a quarter of the United States population, doubling in its current size. Without a doubt, this increase in population is sure to affect American economy and policy. Unfortunately, Latinos seem to be on the slow path to social mobility in the United States, and face many setbacks as a community. More specifically, the Latinx pupil dropout rate is the highest amongst all ethnic groups. While Latinos are enrolling in college at higher rates than ever before they are not graduating with four-year degrees as often as other students. Our course will cover the dynamic linguistic, cultural, and economic themes involved in this discourse. We will reimagine citizenship as it pertains to accessing higher education and discuss tracks and pipelines that have lead Latinx students to different outlets. More specifically, we will cover the impact that location and environment have on a pupil's perception of themselves and their capabilities, while also reflecting on Chicago's history of education and racial segregation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rosa, J. (PI)

CSRE 50Q: Life and Death of Words (ENGLISH 50Q, FEMGEN 50Q, LINGUIST 50Q, NATIVEAM 50Q)

In this course, we explore the world of words: their creation, evolution, borrowing, change, and death. Words are the key to understanding the culture and ideas of a people, and by tracing the biographies of words we are able to discern how the world was, is, and might be perceived and described. We trace how words are formed, and how they change in pronunciation, spelling, meaning, and usage over time. How does a word get into the dictionary? What do words reveal about status, class, region, and race? How is the language of men and women critiqued differently within our society? How does slang evolve? How do languages become endangered or die, and what is lost when they do? We will visit the Facebook Content Strategy Team and learn more about the role words play in shaping our online experiences. Together, the class will collect Stanford language and redesign the digital dictionary of the future. Trigger Warning: Some of the subject matter of this course is sensitive and may cause offense. Please consider this prior to enrolling in the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ogilvie, S. (PI)

CSRE 51Q: Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity (AMSTUD 51Q, COMPLIT 51Q)

We may "know" "who" we "are," but we are, after all, social creatures. How does our sense of self interact with those around us? How does literature provide a particular medium for not only self expression, but also for meditations on what goes into the construction of "the Self"? After all, don't we tell stories in response to the question, "who are you"? Besides a list of nouns and names and attributes, we give our lives flesh and blood in telling how we process the world. Our course focuses in particular on this question--Does this universal issue ("who am I") become skewed differently when we add a qualifier before it, like "ethnic"?
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 99: Housing Justice Research Lab (URBANST 187)

In this course, students will contribute to ongoing community-based research projects focused on housing justice in the Bay Area. Students will work directly with local community organizations working in advocacy, legal aid, and community research. Projects may include interviews, historical research, surveys, case studies, participant observation, media analysis, and writing op-eds. Students will have the opportunity to select from research projects developed by the community partners and instructors. Students that want to engage in an alternative project should consult with the instructors. Students are encouraged to enroll for multiple quarters to develop more substantial projects and deeper relationships with community partners.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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