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ARTHIST 10SC: Photography: Truth or Fiction or...

"All photographs are accurate. None is the truth." Richard Avedon (1923-2004)nThe invention of photography inspired the belief that there could be a truthful and objective way to visually record the world. From portraits to travel photographs to documentary, photography has influenced how modern history is understood and remembered. Yet, a photograph is a manipulated image, shaped by the perspective of the photographer and further framed by its printing, presentation, and interpretation. The complex ethical and political issues associated with photography significantly impact how events and moments are recorded by history. Consider, for example, the US government's 18-year ban (ended in 2009) on photographing the flag-draped coffins of America's war dead as their bodies are returned to the United States. What matters most: protecting the privacy of military families or protecting American citizens from the death toll of war?nnOver the past decade, the number of photographers has increased exponentially, further blurring the boundary between what is truth and what is fiction. Even the concept of "gatekeepers" is obsolete: anyone with a smartphone is armed with a camera and can create their own stories, their own records, and their own truths. Further, the Internet grants nearly universal freedom to document and disseminate images that record, incriminate, illuminate, persuade, enrage, and glorify. In this course, we will examine the ethical parameters of photography and the many ways in which photography contributes to presenting powerful truths, creating compelling fictions, and recontextualizing history.nnThe course will feature opportunities to work with photographs in the Cantor's collection and to explore the many photographic communities of the Bay Area including extensive field trips to museums, galleries, artists studios, private collections, photo studios, and more. Our discussions will also be informed by course readings. In addition, special sessions covering photographic techniques will familiarize students with the diversity of the medium and hands on experience to create work, if interested. No prior experience required. Sophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wolf, C. (PI)

BIO 10SC: Natural History, Marine Biology, and Research

Monterey Bay is home to the nation's largest marine sanctuary and also home to Stanford¿s Hopkins Marine Station. This course, based at Hopkins, explores the spectacular biology of Monterey Bay and the artistic and political history of the region. The course focuses on issues of conservation, sanctuary, and stewardship of the oceans and coastal lands. We will meet with conservationists, filmmakers, artists, authors, environmentalists, politicians, land-use planners, and lawyers, as well as scientists and educators, to learn what is being done to appreciate, protect, and study the coastline and near-shore waters at local and national levels. We will take a look at the discipline of marine biology to discover the range of topics and methods of research it embraces and to help define some of the larger issues in biology that loom in our future. The course emphasizes interactions and discussions between individuals, groups, and our guests; it is a total immersion experience. We will be together all of the time, either at our base at the Belden House in Pacific Grove or hiking and camping in Big Sur.nnStudents are expected to have read the several books provided as introductory material before the course begins, and each is also expected to become our local expert in an area such as plant identification, bird identification, poetry, weather prediction, photography, history, ethnography, etc. The course requires an individual research project of your choice on a topic related to the general theme. Final reports will be presented at the last meeting of the group and may involve any medium, including written, oral, and performance media.nnNote: This course will be held at the Hopkins Marine Station in the Monterey region, and housing will be provided nearby. Transportation from campus to the housing site will be provided once students arrive on campus on August 30. Transportation to campus from the Belden House in Pacific Grove will be provided on September 19. Sophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

CEE 16SC: Energy in the Southwest (ENERGY 11SC, POLISCI 25SC)

The technical, social, and political issues surrounding energy management and use in the West, using California, Nevada, and Arizona as a field laboratory. Students explore energy narratives, such as: Who supplies our energy and from what sources? How is it transported? Who distributes to users and how do they do it? Water for energy and energy for water, two intertwined natural resources. Meeting carbon emission goals by 2020. Conflicts between desert ecosystems and renewable energy development. Emphasis on renewable energy sources and the water-energy nexus. Central to the course is field exploration in northern and southern California, as well as neighboring areas in Arizona and Nevada, to tour sites such as wind and solar facilities, geothermal plants, hydropower pumped storage, desalination plants, water pumping stations, a liquid fuels distribution operations center, and California's Independent System Operator. Students meet with community members and with national, state, and regional authorities to discuss Western energy challenges and viable solutions. Site visits to Stanford's new energy facilities. Introduction to the basics of energy and energy politics through discussions, lectures, and with the help of guest speakers. Assigned readings, online interactive materials, and relevant recent news articles. Participants return to Stanford by September 19. Travel expenses during the course provided (except incidentals) by the Bill Lane Center for the American West and Sophomore College.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEMENG 12SC: An Exploration of Art Materials: The Intersection of Art and Science

There is growing interest in the intersection of art and science, whether from artists adapting technology to suit their visions or from scientists and engineers seeking to explain various visual effects. To take advantage of possible creative sparks at the art/science interface, it is necessary for fuzzies and techies to have some knowledge of the language used by the other side. This interface will be explored through examining approaches used by an artist and an engineer in the context of the materials science of cultural objects. In-class lectures, hands-on studio practice, and field trips will be used to illustrate these different perspectives. At the heart of the scientific approach is the notion that a cultural object, e.g., a painting, is a physical entity comprising materials with different physical properties and different responses to environmental stresses presented by light, heat, and water. In support of this outlook, in-class lectures and discussions will focus on the basic concepts of color, optics, mechanics, composite structures, and response of the object to environmental stress, and we will visit Bay Area museums to see how artists employ such techniques. The hands-on studio experience is designed to increase students' confidence and develop their appreciation of differences in materials. It is not necessary to have any artistic training, only a willingness to experiment. The in-class studio projects will include working with line and shadow; color, binders, and mordants; global sources of pigments; substrates and writing; and material failure. Students will make one technical presentation on a topic in one of the five areas relevant to a painting: color, optics, mechanics, composites, and stress response. In addition, they will prepare one essay on the issues surrounding the intersection of art and science. Finally, they will complete a project related to one of the thematic areas covered in the hands-on studio sessions and make a final oral presentation describing their project. Sophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINGEN 10SC: The Cult of Happiness: Pursuing the Good Life in America and China (COMPLIT 10SC)

The 2006 film Pursuit of Happyness, an unabashed celebration of the American Dream, was enthusiastically embraced by Chinese audiences. It seems that the pursuit of happiness has become truly globalized, even as the American Dream is slipping away for many. Are Americans still convinced that their conception of happiness is a self-evident truth and a universal gospel? Is there anything that Americans might learn about what it means to live a good life from not only the distant past, but also cultures in which happiness is conceptualized and sought after very differently? This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the question of happiness and invites undergraduate students to reflect on its relationship to virtue, wisdom, health, love, prosperity, justice, and solidarity. Giving equal weight to Chinese and Western sources, it seeks to defamiliarize some of the most deeply held ideas and values in American society through the lens of cross-cultural inquiry.n nDuring the summer, students will read a selection of novels, memoirs, and reflections by philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists. In September, we will review these texts and place them alongside movies, short fiction, news stories, and social commentary while we interrogate the chimera of happiness. In addition to daily seminars, we will experiment with meditation, short-form life writing, and service learning with participation of local elders. Furthermore, there will be at least three guest speakers, including a prominent Confucian philosopher and a Stanford alum now running a happiness-related enterprise. nSophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, H. (PI)

COMPLIT 10SC: The Cult of Happiness: Pursuing the Good Life in America and China (CHINGEN 10SC)

The 2006 film Pursuit of Happyness, an unabashed celebration of the American Dream, was enthusiastically embraced by Chinese audiences. It seems that the pursuit of happiness has become truly globalized, even as the American Dream is slipping away for many. Are Americans still convinced that their conception of happiness is a self-evident truth and a universal gospel? Is there anything that Americans might learn about what it means to live a good life from not only the distant past, but also cultures in which happiness is conceptualized and sought after very differently? This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the question of happiness and invites undergraduate students to reflect on its relationship to virtue, wisdom, health, love, prosperity, justice, and solidarity. Giving equal weight to Chinese and Western sources, it seeks to defamiliarize some of the most deeply held ideas and values in American society through the lens of cross-cultural inquiry.n nDuring the summer, students will read a selection of novels, memoirs, and reflections by philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists. In September, we will review these texts and place them alongside movies, short fiction, news stories, and social commentary while we interrogate the chimera of happiness. In addition to daily seminars, we will experiment with meditation, short-form life writing, and service learning with participation of local elders. Furthermore, there will be at least three guest speakers, including a prominent Confucian philosopher and a Stanford alum now running a happiness-related enterprise. nSophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, H. (PI)

COMPLIT 13SC: Arabic in America: Language Immersion

Do you speak Arabic at home? Are you studying Arabic at Stanford? Have you done a year of Arabic study elsewhere? If you answer yes to any one of these questions then "Arabic in America: Language Immersion" might be for you. nnOur intensive course is designed to improve your command of Arabic while living in an active community of Arabic speakers and learners. We will be talking about films, poetry, politics, religion, gender and much more--all the while practicing how to talk to people, read newspapers, recite poetry, write emails, all with the goal of communicating better in Arabic. nnYour three teachers will share their knowledge and love of Arabic literature, culture, and grammar with you while we engage with all kinds of Arabic, from the Quran and Pre-Islamic poetry to the colloquial Arabic spoken at barbecues (we will be grilling!). We will also be inviting guest speakers and taking class field trips to the Ba'th Party archives in the Hoover Library, mosques and churches in the Bay Area, Middle Eastern restaurants, and more. Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPMED 10SC: Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Mammals

This course introduces the student to common laboratory, domestic, and exotic mammals through lectures, dissection labs and student presentations. Using a comparative approach, investigates the unique adaptations of species in terms of their morphological, anatomical, and behavioral characteristics. Focus on how these species interact with their own and other species (including humans), discuss basic evolution, and the devastating impact of habitat destruction on wild animals. Class provides the student with a deeper appreciation for the diversity of the mammalian orders, along with the fundamentals of comparative anatomy, physiology, and basic dissection techniques. A large collection of skulls, bones and plastinated organs facilitate learning mammalian anatomy, and a field trip to a local zoo enables students to appreciate behavior and locomotion of assorted mammals in their ¿native¿ habitats.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bouley, D. (PI)

COMPMED 11SC: Life in the Zoo: Behavior, Welfare and Enrichment

Emphasis is on how animal welfare sciences provide an evidence-based approach to optimize and balance each of these demands so that "good welfare is good business." Topics include how to apply principles of animal behavior to design environmental enrichments beneficial to both animals and complex mission of the zoo; assessing exhibits from the point of view of animal behavior and well-being, educational opportunities and guest experience; developing an enrichment plan; designing and building enrichments for animals; interacting with the public as docents; assessing overall effectiveness of new enrichment. Class includes experience at San Francisco Zoo.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garner, J. (PI)

CS 10SC: Great Ideas in Computer Science

Computers have come to permeate many aspects of our lives, from how we communicate with each other to how we produce and consume information. And while it is all too easy to think of computing in terms of the products and applications we see emerging from technology companies, the intellectual foundations of computer science go much deeper. Indeed, beneath the surface of the tools we use, the social networks we engage in, and the web of information we search, lays a field rich with fascinating, intellectually exciting, and sometimes unexpectedly surprising ideas.nnIn this seminar, we will explore several of the great ideas in computer science, looking at both challenging problems and their impact on real applications. From understanding how search engines on the Web work to looking at mathematical theories underlying social networks, from questioning whether a computer can be intelligent to analyzing the notion of what is even possible to compute, this seminar will take us on a series of intellectual excursions that will change the way you look at computers.nnNo prior experience with computer science or programming is required, but a high school mathematics background, an interest in problem-solving, and a healthy curiosity will go a long way toward ensuring an enjoyable and enlightening experience. Students will work in small groups to research topics in computer science they find most intriguing. The course will also take advantage of Stanford's location in the heart of Silicon Valley by conducting field trips to a local company and the Computer History Museum. Sophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Roberts, E. (PI)
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