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1 - 10 of 456 results for: LAW

LAW 218: JSD Research Colloquium

Required for and limited to JSD candidates. The objective of the colloquium is to assist students in developing their dissertation research proposals. Weekly colloquium sessions will include a mix of lectures and discussions on selected methodological topics, relevant to the candidates' dissertation research; guest lectures by empirical legal research scholars; presentations by and discussions with more advanced doctoral candidates; and presentations by the first year JSD candidates.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Hensler, D. (PI)

LAW 224: Federal Litigation: Coursework

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated public interest case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure, privacy, and first amendment law. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions for dismissal, class action certification, and preliminary injunctive relief. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and constitutional law. Attendance, class participation and written assignments. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 224B: Federal Litigation: Methods

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated public interest case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure, privacy, and first amendment law. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions for dismissal, class action certification, and preliminary injunctive relief. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and constitutional law. Attendance, class participation and written assignments. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 226: Accounting

The objective of financial accounting is to measure economic activity for decision-making. Financial statements are a key product of this measurement process and an important component of firms' financial reporting activities. This course is aimed at developing students' ability to read, understand, and use corporate financial statements. The primary focus is on understanding the mapping between underlying economic events and financial statements, and how this mapping can affect inferences about future firm profitability. To this end, the course will provide an introduction to: (1) accrual accounting concepts, principles and conventions; (2) the process of preparing and presenting the primary financial statements (income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows); (3) the judgment involved and discretion allowed in making accounting choices; (4) the effects of accounting discretion on the quality of the (reported) financial information; and (5) the fundamentals of financial statement analysis. Class time will be allocated to a combination of short lectures and discussions of the assigned cases. The assigned cases are based on actual corporate financial statements and/or "real life" financial situations. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments, final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Stanton, F. (PI)

LAW 253: Advanced Civil Procedure

This course will address major areas of civil procedure that receive little attention in the basic first-year course as well as broader questions of procedural design. We will address more complex forms of litigation by studying the joinder of claims and parties, preclusion doctrines, class actions, and arbitration, with special attention to the impact of these doctrines and practices on civil rights and social justice litigation. We will also explore questions of procedural design, especially through comparing U.S. procedure to procedural regimes of other countries. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Sinnar, S. (PI)

LAW 255: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit the Consent Enrollment Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (Click "Registration" and then click "Law Students"). See Consent Enrollment Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 255: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention to equal protection, substantive due process, and state action. Topics addressed will include equal protection in relation to race, gender, and sexual orientation, and substantive due process in relation to procreation, sexuality, and relationships. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Rhode, D. (PI)

LAW 281: Natural Resources Law and Policy

Natural resource management presents extremely difficult and contentious issues of law and public policy. Major debates continue to rage over issues such as the Endangered Species Act, whether the United States should permit drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and how to prevent the overfishing of the oceans. This course will focus on two major aspects of natural-resource management: biodiversity protection (including the Endangered Species Act, ocean fisheries management, and global protection of marine mammals) and public lands in the United States such as national parks and wilderness areas. The course also will examine the National Environmental Protection Act and the effectiveness of environmental impact assessments. Class sessions will include critical examinations of current law and policy and in-depth discussions of situational case studies that force you to consider how you would resolve real-life issues. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions. (This course will not examine either water law or energy law in any depth. Water Law will be offered again in the 2015-2016 academic year. Several other courses in the Law School deal with energy-law questions.) Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam (open book).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Thompson, B. (PI)

LAW 283: Federal Courts

This course addresses the role of the federal courts in the American system of federalism and separation of powers, as well as their role in the development of substantive federal law and constitutional rights. A central premise of the course is that the institutional, political, and constitutional features of federal court litigation cannot be understood without engaging the historical context, especially the social, political, and legal movements, in response to which the federal courts have developed. Thus while many of the traditional aspects of federal court jurisprudence will be covered (e.g., federal common law including implied rights of action, justiciability doctrines and other doctrines of restraint, congressional power to limit the jurisdiction of the federal courts and to create "legislative courts" outside of Article III, Supreme Court review of judgments, state sovereign immunity, litigating against the government, and federal habeas corpus), doctrine will be placed alongside interdisciplinary readings on social, political, and theoretical accounts that reveal how the courts and ordinary Americans have come to understand the distinctive role of the federal courts, as well as claims for expansion or contraction of their powers. The course is strongly recommended for students interested in pursuing a career in litigation and/or judicial clerkships in the federal courts. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, class participation, take home exam and short paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 290: Evidence

This course examines the law of proof, with special attention to the Federal Rules of Evidence, constitutional restrictions on proving facts in criminal cases, and selected provisions of the California Evidence Code that diverge significantly from federal law. Topics include relevance, unfair prejudice, hearsay, confrontation, character evidence, impeachment, and expert witnesses. Special Instructions: Add-drop decisions need to be resolved by the end of the first week of instruction; no drops will be permitted thereafter. Elements used in grading: Final Exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Sklansky, D. (PI)
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