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1 - 10 of 21 results for: EASTASN

EASTASN 189K: The Political Transition for Economic Development in East Asian: Government or Market? (EASTASN 289K)

This course aims to understand the role of government and market in the process of economic development in East Asia and change in the role depending upon development stages, political ideology, and cultural traditions. The course will examine a couple of leading forces, market and government, in encouraging each national economy, and how the dynamic combination has been changed, is being changed, and will be changed. For this purpose, we will explore a political economic framework for analyzing the economic development stages; then concentrate on comparative and case studies; and try to seek informative hypotheses and propositions for East Asian experiences, and reach persuasive lessons which can be applied to other developing countries.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Oh, Y. (PI)

EASTASN 289K: The Political Transition for Economic Development in East Asian: Government or Market? (EASTASN 189K)

This course aims to understand the role of government and market in the process of economic development in East Asia and change in the role depending upon development stages, political ideology, and cultural traditions. The course will examine a couple of leading forces, market and government, in encouraging each national economy, and how the dynamic combination has been changed, is being changed, and will be changed. For this purpose, we will explore a political economic framework for analyzing the economic development stages; then concentrate on comparative and case studies; and try to seek informative hypotheses and propositions for East Asian experiences, and reach persuasive lessons which can be applied to other developing countries.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Oh, Y. (PI)

EASTASN 300: Graduate Directed Reading

Independent studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. For East Asian Studies M.A. students only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EASTASN 390: Practicum Internship

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 94: The Rise of China in World Affairs (EASTASN 294)

This course examines the impact and implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics from a historical and international relations perspective. It reviews China's halting progress into the international system, sketches the evolution of PRC foreign policy since 1949, and analyzes China's developmental priorities and domestic political context as they figure into Beijing's interactions with the world. It sketches American policy toward the PRC, and it assesses alternative approaches to dealing with China on such issues as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 97: The International Relations of Asia since World War II (EASTASN 297)

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 117: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 217)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 120E: East Asian Internets (EASTASN 220E)

This course examines the social, cultural, aesthetic, and political dimensions of internet culture in China, Japan, and the two Koreas. Working with web texts, social media, streaming music and video, and film and fiction engaging with online culture, we will trace the social impact of networked life in East Asia over the last three decades.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EASTASN 151: Innovation-Based Economic Growth: Silicon Valley and Japan (EASTASN 251, IPS 225)

Innovation is essential for the growth of a matured economy. An important reason for Japan's economic stagnation over the past two decades was its failure to transform its economic system from one suited for catch-up growth to one that supports innovation-based economic growth. This course examines the institutional factors that support innovation-based economic growth and explores policies that may encourage innovation-based growth in Japan. The course is a part of a bigger policy implementation project that aims to examine the institutional foundations of innovation-based economic growth, to suggest government policies that encourage innovation-based growth in Japan, and to help implement such policies. The central part of the course will be several group research projects conducted by the students. Each student research project evaluates a concrete innovation policy idea. Each student research group is to report the findings to the class and prepare the final paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EASTASN 162: Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present (EASTASN 262)

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)
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