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31 - 40 of 222 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 110: Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies (COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X, FEMGEN 310X)

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course 110 or 110X for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 50: Using Tech for Good

Students in the class will work in small teams to implement high-impact projects for partner organizations. Taught by the CS+Social Good team, the aim of the class is to empower you to leverage technology for social good by inspiring action, facilitating collaboration, and forging pathways towards global change. Recommended: CS 106B, CS 42 or 142. Class is open to students of all years. May be repeated for credit. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Get real-world experience launching and developing your own social impact projects! Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Along with support, resources, and community discussion, the class provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while providing students with experience engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. Prerequisite: CS 147, equivalent experience, or consent of instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 106S: Programming Abstractions and Social Good

Supplemental lab to CS 106B and CS 106X. Students will apply fundamental computer science concepts learned in 106B/X to problems in the social good space (such as health, government, education, and environment). Course consists of in-class activities designed by local tech companies and nonprofits. Corequisite: 106B or 106X.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 377E: Designing Solutions to Global Grand Challenges

In this course we creatively apply information technologies to collectively attack Global Grand Challenges (e.g., global warming, rising healthcare costs and declining access, and ensuring quality education for all). Interdisciplinary student teams will carry out need-finding within a target domain, followed by brainstorming to propose a quarter long project. Teams will spend the rest of the quarter applying user-centered design methods to rapidly iterate through design, prototyping, and testing of their solutions. This course will interweave a weekly lecture with a weekly studio session where students apply the techniques hands-on in a small-scale, supportive environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 21: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 78: Art + Community: Division, Resilience & Reconciliation (AFRICAAM 78)

Violence and trauma isolates and segregates us. Part of the healing process must be about coming back into community. Freedom is meaningful only insofar as it lifts all, especially those who have been done the most harm. In times of violence and polarization, art can heal and brings people together. In this course, we will explore how we make and sustain community, especially in the face of threats from within and without. We will do this especially through examining how artists and culture workers of color develop and advance practices that build mutuality, criticality, renewal, trust, and joy in the face of ongoing racial injustice and cultural inequity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 95: Liberation Through Land: Organic Gardening and Racial Justice (EARTHSYS 95)

Through field trips, practical work and readings, this course provides students with the tools to begin cultivating a relationship to land that focuses on direct engagement with sustainable gardening, from seed to harvest. The course will take place on the O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm, where students will be given the opportunity to learn how to sow seeds, prepare garden beds, amend soils, build compost, and take care of plants. The history of forced farm labor in the U.S., from slavery to low-wage migrant labor, means that many people of color encounter agricultural spaces as sites of trauma and oppression. In this course we will explore the potential for revisiting a narrative of peaceful relation to land and crop that existed long before the trauma occurred, acknowledging the beautiful history of POC coexistence with land. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation. Application available at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScdKKp7mtTNzS0-qc-La97LPj9w8SsWNZ5xrAYVjiKTR86F6Q/viewform?usp=sf_link; deadline to apply is September 19, 2017, at midnight. The course is co-sponsored by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA) and the Earth Systems Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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